The Sims Freeplay [Mobile Game Review]

Rachel Mii | DoubleJump.comHappy Thursday!

Last month I said I was going to start playing more mobile games and do “mini” reviews on them. So, here’s the first one.

Mobile Game Review: The Sims Freeplay | iPad Games | The Sims | Game Review | Video Games | Gaming | DoublexJump.com

The Sims Freeplay is a free mobile game developed by EA Mobile. It was originally released for iOS on December 15, 2011. This is a game that I had originally discovered on Facebook. I was in my second year of college at the time and I used to play it in the library on campus when waiting for my class to start or simply waiting for my friends to get out of class so we could go home. Overall, the Facebook game was a much simpler version of The Sims Freeplay… even though The Sims Freeplay is already pretty simple.

When it comes to game play for The Sims Freeplay, there’s not much to it. Once you open the game, there’s a tutorial that takes forever to get through. It’s such a simple game and most people have played The Sims, that I think we’d be able to figure out how to make our Sim go to the bathroom. Once you do get through the tutorial though, there’s not too much to do in the game. The tutorial maxed out your Sim’s needs and already had you build a new house and a career area.

The map, or neighborhood, in The Sims Freeplay is fairly big. Nothing is build and you have to do it all yourself. However, each building – which can be houses, careers, or general places such as a park or pet shop – needs to meet certain requirements. Every building costs a certain amount of money and you need to have a certain amount of Sims in your town in order to build it. Plus, some don’t unlock until you get to a certain level. Also, by building you up the worth of your town as a whole. This means, anything else you build after that, will go up in price as well the amount of Sims you need, etc.

This makes sense and normally wouldn’t be a problem, but everything is so expensive too. You start off with one Sim and even if you give them a job, they don’t make nearly enough money to save up. So, you create more Sims. But, of course, creating more Sims means more money to build houses. I ended up creating lots instead of houses because they were the cheapest. I had all my Sims at one house and bought a bunch of beds so they were “unofficially” moved into their friend’s house. It saved me a decent amount of money, anyway. Also, you can only build one thing at a time. Lots were the fastest because they were the cheapest so I was able to play longer.

Building takes time – real life time. So, if you want to build the Stadium so a Sim can become an athlete for a career, but you need five Sims in town, then you need to build a house first which could take a few hours. Once you get that, building the Stadium will take even longer.

In fact, everything in the game is real-life time. If my Sim needed to go to the bathroom, it took about six seconds. Not bad, right? But if they were hungry, it would take them 20 minutes to cook a hamburger. The more food they learned to cook, the longer it took. Eating the food afterward took 10 minutes. It got to the point where I’d have them do something and then I’d exit out of the game to play something else. I barely played at all.

When the Sims go to work, which they have to because I already talked about how expensive everything is, the time various from six hours to ten hours. Yes, these are normal work hours in real life, but… really? I guess I could send my Sim to work at the same time I go to work, but what about the weekends? The game count real life time but not real life days. Days don’t exist in The Sims Freeplay. There’s no day and night cycle – they go to sleep when they’re tired and I tell them to (sleeping varies from eight to 11 hours as well). So, if they get home from work, the game will wait a few hours and then the work button will continuously blink telling you they should go to work. It’s annoying.

Despite all this, I wanted to get far enough in the game to have two of my Sims get married, have kids, and get a pet. Well, The Sims Freeplay has “quests” that you need to download. You need to complete these quests in order to unlock certain things your Sims can do. So, even though I had spent money on building the Pet Shop, when I tried to get a pet, the game told me to download a certain quest, complete it, and then I would be able to use the Pet Shop. It was the same thing when I tried to romance two of my Sims.

The downloads are free, but takes up so much storage space. The game, without the quests, takes up a good chunk of space as well. With the other games and work apps I have on my iPad, I really didn’t want to download the various quests. I thought of doing one or two for the sake of this review, but… I really didn’t care enough to. Because honestly, as soon as this review goes live on the blog, the game is getting deleted from my iPad.

The Sims Freeplay gets a rating of…

Play It | Download It | DELETE IT

Overall, The Sims Freeplay isn’t a bad concept. I know things are limited for a mobile game, especially when it’s free. However, the game play was too minimal for me and the things I were able to do were too constricted. It was because of this I wasn’t able to have fun with it.

Have you played The Sims Freeplay before? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you like this post, please share it around.

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3 thoughts on “The Sims Freeplay [Mobile Game Review]

  1. For me The Sims has always been a PC experience. The industry is trying to fit everything on phones, but won’t always work.
    Thanks for the honest review :>

    • Same here. PC Sims is the best Sims. Though there are so many mobile version of games that I’m determined to check them all out and see how “good” they are, lol.

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