Flashback Friday: Twilight Princess

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

We’re at the end of another Zelda Month! To tie up the month with a nice little bow, this month our Flashback Friday is dedicated to Twilight Princess, one of the best selling games in the Legend of Zelda franchise.

Legend of Zelda | Twilight Princess | Nintendo | Video Games | Gaming | Doublexjump.com

Released for both the GameCube and the Wii near the end of 2006, The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess was the thirteenth game in the franchise, taking place in the same timeline as Ocarina of Time and Majora’s Mask but hundreds of years in the future. Its more realistic and darker graphics were a result of the Toon Link art style of The Wind Waker a few years prior.

Twilight Princess has been hailed as one of the best video games of all time, and was the best selling Legend of Zelda game — although, being ported to three different Nintendo consoles probably helped — until that record was broken by Breath of the Wild a dozen years later in 2018, which was both for the Wii U and the Switch.

I remember getting so excited for this game when it was first announced. Aside from the graphics and the hint of gorgeously haunting music, the fact that Link shapeshifts into a wolf was what I was most looking forward to. Wolves have always been a favorite animal of mine, especially when I was younger.

(Remember those little girls in elementary school who were obsessed with horses? That was me, but with wolves.)

Despite already having it on the GameCube, we definitely bought the HD version for the Wii U and marveled at the improved graphics while diving into the world of twilight once more. It was fantastic revisiting that version of Hyrule, which felt so big and was wonderful to explore while riding Epona, and Midna was a great companion character. Her story was bittersweet, and I totally wouldn’t mind buying this game a third time if it ever came onto the Switch in order to enjoy it once again.

How does Twilight Princess stack against your favorite Legend of Zelda games? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Ada Lovelace

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

I’m doing a little something different this month in regards to Flashback Friday. Instead of celebrating an older game, this post will be about a person who has influenced the history of technology with her contributions in the field.

Ada Lovelace | Video Games | Technology | History | Computers | Nintendo | Doublexjump.com

Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace — also known more simply as Ada Lovelace — was a woman born in 1815 and only lived until 1852. She is often credited with creating the first computer program, creating an algorithm designed to be carried out by a machine.

Ada’s father, the poet Lord Byron, disappeared out of her life only a month after she was born, separating from her mother. Considering Lord Byron fled from their family to sire more children — and having fathered one, most likely two, other children before Ada with other women — Ada’s mother was bitter and encouraged Ada’s love of mathematics and logic to steer Ada away from Lord Byron’s way of waxing poetics. Despite this, Ada still admired her father’s work, requesting to even be buried next to her upon her death.

With her skills and learning in mathematics and logic, Ada’s studies helped her meet fellow mathematician Charles Babbage, who is considered the father of computers. Indeed, he created the first Analytical Engine, piquing Ada’s interest. Babbage’s notes had fragments of programs, but Ada’s was the first complete algorithm to be written and published.

Aside from publishing the first program, it is also written that Ada was the first person to see greater potential in the Analytical Engine. Rather than just performing logical equations and math, it was Ada who expressed that the Engine could potentially create music and art with the right programming. Considering the major steps programming and computers have taken within the past couple of centuries, Ada Lovelace was definitely ahead of her time. Can you imagine if computers and algorithms were mainly used just for number-crunching? How video games would have been affected?

Due to her feats in this field, every second Tuesday of October is Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of women and their achievements in the STEM fields. I am sad to only have just discovered this. To see an event that promotes women in typically male-dominated fields and, in turn, tries to encourage more girls to join these fields and helps to sponsor them.

I remember vividly in college that I was one of only two woman in most of my computer networking class. While the majority of my classmates weren’t bad, there were a couple of instances where it was joked that I did well on a project here or there because I was a woman and the professor was male, a suggestion that may not have been made had the men known about more women in technology fields. I hope that Ada Lovelace Day, which is only a decade old, continues to reach, support, and encourage people — women, men, and others alike — in the coming years.

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Flashback Friday: Golden Sun

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

The year is three-quarters over, and there are about ninety days left until Christmas. Isn’t that crazy?

Golden Sun | Video Games | Gaming | Nintendo | Game Boy | Doublexjump.com

Golden Sun is a game that I need to play again. I never actually owned it, but I remember a friend lending it to me sometime in sixth grade. She scolded me at one point when I told her where I was in the story and what level I was at. Apparently I wasn’t keeping up with my characters’ levels while advancing the story!

This game was released for the Game Boy Advance in 2001, and the RPG was critically acclaimed, getting almost perfect reviews. It was traditional for the genre in which the players controlled four characters in a party and traveled throughout a fantasy land as they advance the story. Like most RPGs, there is a magic system, with Golden Sun’s magic being based on the classical elements. The magic is called Psynergy and wielders are Adepts. However, the magic that is involved in the game is also used outside of battle for solving puzzles. Instead of playing completely linear, players are allowed to return to previous locations to solve puzzles they couldn’t before after unlocking the magic needed to do so.

Golden Sun also employed little creatures called Djinn. Djinn are found in the world and can be set to a character, helping with the character’s magic and class, among other attributes. Djinn have their own elements and can be mixed and matched when put with a character, offering a wide variety of spells and effects for battles.

I honestly don’t remember too much of this game, but I do remember that I enjoyed the game enough to ask for Golden Sun: Dark Dawn when that had been released for the Nintendo DS back in 2010. With that said, I haven’t played too much of Dark Dawn. Perhaps I should rectify that…

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: The Little Mermaid

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

July is almost over and, with it, a little more than half of the year! What are you planning on doing for the rest of 2019? I hope you’ve been creating and meeting some awesome goals!

Video Games | The Little Mermaid | Gaming | Nintendo | NES | Doublexjump.com

There was plenty of buzz around the internet lately about the casting of the live-action The Little Mermaid. With all the talk of that upcoming movie, it reminded me of one of the few NES games that I remember having and occasionally playing.

The Little Mermaid was first released for the NES and the Gameboy July 19, 1991, a little over 28 years ago and just makes me feel really old. The game actually doesn’t follow the movie plot line. Instead, the opening sequence mentions that Ursula lived, somehow, and captured some of Ariel’s friends, so she tells Prince Eric, “I’ll be back later,” and turns back into a mermaid and swims off to rescue them.

There are only five levels for this game, most of which I do not remember. Really, I watched a small, 20-ish minute play through of it on YouTube and the only pull that I think this would have had for me as a kid was that it was Disney. It was simplistic in nature, but seeing the so-called story for the game also got me thinking about how Ariel just ditched Prince Eric — who she spent most of the movie getting — to save her friends. She showed initiative, which I thought was pretty cool before being a little mind-numbed by the gameplay.

Yet, if I find The Little Mermaid on Steam or on an emulator, I probably would give it another go just for the heck of it.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Tomodachi Life

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Guys, June is pretty much over. The year is half over. How have you all been doing? We’ve been going through our older games, figuring out games to return to amid all of the new releases that have been coming out lately.

Tomodachi Life | Video Games | Friday | Nintendo | Doublexjump.com

Tomodachi Life was a game that I was a bit skeptical of when I first heard about it. It sounded so silly but I was looking forward to it nonetheless. Anything else that we could do with the Miis was amusing to me.

Tomodachi Life came out for the 3DS in Japan in April 2013 and in 2014 for the rest of the world. It’s a simulation game where one has an island of Miis that can interact with each other. It’s not a gameplay-heavy game. Rather, you move various Miis onto the island where their personalities influence the activities they do, such as eating, collecting outfits, and developing relationships — both platonic and romantic — with each other. It had positive reviews, inspiring the mobile app Miitomo and, a few years later, Miitopia.

It’s actually a fun little game that I need to return to and see what my Miis are up to. I’m pretty sure my “look-alike” Mii is married and has kids. I’ve been thinking about the game lately, mainly because I’ve returned to Miitopia.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Link’s Awakening

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Can you believe that E3 is right around the corner? I’m looking forward to the many new games that are waiting to be announced or for new information to be shown on games that we already know are coming… such as a certain remake of a beloved Legend of Zelda game!

Flashback Friday | Legend of Zelda | Link's Awakening | Video Games | Doublexjump.com

Hailed as one of the best video games of all time, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening was released in 1993 for the Game Boy and re-released in 1998 for the Game Boy Color. The game itself is unique in that it’s one of the few Legend of Zelda games that does not take place in Hyrule or feature Princess Zelda and the Triforce relic.

Admittedly, I never finished the game. It didn’t appeal to me the way Ocarina of Time did, being all 3D and on the big television screen. I tend to enjoy the console Legend of Zelda games more so than the handheld games. I enjoyed the game play and the little nods to the Mario franchise, with the Chain Chomp and the Yoshi doll, but Younger Kris was more interested in other games at that time.

Nevertheless, I’m looking forward to the Switch release of the game. Considering how little I’ve played of the original, this will be like a new Legend of Zelda game for me!

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Tiny Toon Adventures Buster Busts Loose

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Since Easter was last Sunday, I figured I would try to find a game that starred a rabbit. This old game is way back in the time of the SNES and was one of our favorites.

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Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster Busts Loose was a game released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System way back in 1992 in Japan and 1993 in Europe and North America. It was developed and published by Konami, which also did plenty of other video games based on cartoon series, such as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Batman: the Animated Series.

Does anyone else remember Tiny Toons Adventures? We grew up with Looney Toons, mainly due to our older sister and our Uncle Kevin. Tiny Toons Adventures was such a clever cartoon to us, as we found it amusing how the likes of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd were teachers at a school for younger toons. Two of the main characters of the show were Buster and Babs. Many of the characters from the show are featured in this game, and it is Buster who is the main playable character.

This is a short and sweet side-scrolling platform — not that I remember ever finishing it, admittedly — with only about five or six levels depending on which difficulty you are playing. As Buster, you explore each level to get to the main objective, which changed from level to level. Looking this game up again was rather nostalgic, and I’m wondering if I’d be able to find it on an emulator somewhere just to give it another try.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Sonic Battle

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Hey, guys, with the end of March, 2019 is a quarter of the way over. Isn’t that kind of scary to think about? 

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Sonic the Hedgehog has an interesting reputation. The majority of people believe his earlier games are the best examples of the speedy hedgehog, but his later games seemed to do well enough for them to keep on coming. I was always a fan of the character, even if his games weren’t the best quality, and one of my favorite games that featured Sonic was Sonic Battle for the Gameboy Advance. Considering Sonic is known for his super speed, a fighting game starring the character was a bit unorthodox, but I found it fun.

Sonic Battle was released in Japan at the end of 2003 and North America and Europe at the beginning of 2004. It got mostly mixed reviews, with most of its fighting and arena aspects being praised but its story and some mechanics being criticized. The battles themselves were fought in 3D stages, each with their own design, while the characters themselves were 2D, reminding me briefly of the graphics in the Paper Mario series.

There were a plethora of characters, each with their own standard attacks and combos, as well as heavy attacks, air attacks, upper attacks, and aim attacks. Sonic’s attacks relied mostly on speed, Shadow had the use of Chaos Control in his combos, Knuckles was one of the heavier hitters, etc. One character, Emerl, is the most unique in the game. As an ancient Gizoid, Emerl has the ability to copy attacks from the other characters after engaging them in a fight. These attacks are represented as cards and the player can build a custom move-set for Emerl to use throughout the story. It gave the game some replayability, even with the linear storyline.

Still, it was fun. It had the characters I cared about in a light that wasn’t seen too often. Sonic Battle is one of the few Gameboy Advance games that, even to this day, I would play casually when given the chance.

Have you played Sonic Battle? What did you think of it?

Save the date! We’re doing a special Twitch Stream to celebrate the Nintendo Switch! You can learn more about it here.

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Flashback Friday: Beauty and the Beast – A Board Game Adventure

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

February is almost gone, another month down from the year. I hope everyone had a great February and that you’re all looking forward to what March will bring!

Kris_FlashbackBeautybeast

Beauty and the Beast is one of the most popular Disney movies. While dogsitting this past week, one of the go-to Netflix movies I would stick on for background noise while playing with the puppy (and writing during the few times the puppy napped) was the live-action Beauty and the Beast movie with Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Bard, and a bunch of other big name actors. It’s not my favorite adaptation of the movie, but I didn’t find it bad. Seeing the movie again reminded me of one of my first Gameboy Color games.

Beauty and the Beast: A Board Game Adventure was released in October 1999. It was like an extremely watered down version of Mario Party but with the characters from Beauty and the Beast. You pick a character and race around the board, occasionally landing on mini game spaces. There were only ten mini games, such as helping Lumiere avoid water drops or finding Chip among identical teacups. One of the selling points was that up to four players can play by passing around the system, “no cable link required!” There was also a Story Mode, where you would race Gaston in each of the boards.

Considering I got this game the same time I got Pokemon Yellow, Blue, and Red, I don’t believe I played it too often. I do remember having a fun time when I did play it. The mini games got stale after a little while — really, there were only so many times you can play as Beast hopping and ducking from wolves — but the game itself wasn’t a bad way to pass the time.

Have you played Beauty and the Beast: A Board Game Adventure? What did you think of it?

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Flashback Friday: Super Mario All-Stars

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Can you believe we’re already near the end of January? The first month of 2019 has flown right by us! Any old or leftover games from 2018 that you’re still trying to finish up?

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Super Mario All-Stars was released on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1993 and is a compiled collection of the Super Mario games that were available on the Nintendo Entertainment System. It includes Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, Super Mario Bros. 3, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, which actually wasn’t released outside of Japan aside from this compilation. While I was a bit too young to remember much of the NES, I have clear memories of All-Stars, enough so when we spotted the 2010 Wii port of the game at a GameStop, we nabbed it.

I mostly remember our older sister playing through some of the levels on the original Super Mario Bros. games and trying my hand at it occasionally when I was able to hold the controller. I wasn’t that great at the games then and, even with the Wii port, I’m still not great with them now. The Mario Bros. games have never been my favorites to play, but I can definitely recognize them as the classics that they are. Growing up as a Nintendo girl, I respect the influence the games have had on the gaming community and culture as a whole.

My fondest memories of these games, aside from their influence, is actually playing with my sisters. Being player two to my older sister and then player one to Rachel was always a good time, even if the games themselves were never beaten.

Have you played Super Mario All-Stars, or the individual games in the compilation? What did you think of them?

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