Friday Favorites: New Horizons Wish List

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday everyone!

I’m still enjoying my time in Animal Crossing: New Horizons for the most part. There are definitely some improvements that could be made, especially to the crafting system, that I would like to see in future patches, though. This is my wish list for improvements to the game that I hope to one day see.

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Weapon Durability Indicator

I actually like the crafting aspect in New Horizons. However, I would like an indication as to when my tools are about to break. Even a little hint, a pop-up bubble mentioning that the tool is feeling brittle or “flimsy,” would be nice. While eventually my island will have more bridges and such to connect the different parts of the island together, it is annoying to start searching further away from my workbench only for my tools to break without warning.

Craft/Redeem Miles In Bulk

I know I’m not the only one who wants this patched into the game. Crafting is great, but why is there no option yet to craft two or three fishing rods at a time? Why are we only able to create one at a time even when we clearly have enough materials to craft multiple tools and items? On that note, it is a little tedious to have to buy one Nook Mile ticket at a time. I would like the option to buy those in bulk, if you have enough miles, please.

“Preferred” Mystery Islands

The mystery island tours can be fun, but I have found myself going on multiple ones due to being disappointed at where I first landed. I’ve found myself at similar islands, and I understand the mystery islands are probably recycling several of the same types, that do not have the resources I was looking for and ended up racing back to my island to get another Nook Miles ticket to try again. Aside from possibly having the option to go from one mystery tour straight to another — if you have the proper amount of Nook Miles tickets in your inventory — I would also like a little bit of a choice as to where you end up. For instance, if Orville asks what kind of island I’m looking for, I can say one with fruit trees or plenty of rocks or long rivers. Having “no preference” as a response can keep islands more random.

“Write” DIY Recipes

Collecting DIY recipes is great and being able to mail and swap items with friends is awesome, but I would love to be able to “write” DIY recipes to send to friends. They can send me an item, sure, but I would prefer the actual DIY recipe so I can always make the item if need be. I have no idea how many DIY recipes there are in the game, either. I think it would be another nice way for others to connect by sharing DIY recipes with each other.

What features and mechanics do you wish were in Animal Crossing: New Horizons? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Binge Buying Indie Games

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krismii
Everyone knows how expensive gaming is as a hobby, right? Thank goodness for indie games! For less than the price of first-party games, we bought half a dozen indie games to enjoy for a while. I believe all of these games are visual novels, or at least close to it, right?

rachmii
Yes, ironically enough, these are all visual novels for the most part. This is fine because we both enjoy that genre and we haven’t played too many visual novels lately. These are games we stumbled upon or have been on our radar for a while. A first-party Nintendo Switch game is about $60. These games together, at the time we bought them, totaled about $48. So, we got six games for the price of one and we still could have gotten more if we wanted to match the $60. Overall, I think it was a good haul.

indieblindmen

A rated-M game? On Double Jump’s Switch? We guess so since Blind Men was randomly found and recently released on the Nintendo Switch. It seems simultaneously ridiculous and intriguing since you play as an aspiring supervillain in this visual novel.

indieflorence

Florence is a shorter visual novel that takes its inspiration from the “slice-of-life” genre and is about a young woman navigating a romance that uproots her stale routine. Jett from In Third Person praised this game last month, and we figure we’re probably going to end up crying while enjoying this.

indiecoffeetalk

Coffee Talk has a few elements that really got us interested — fantasy characters, pixel art, branching storylines, and, of course, coffee! While we heard about this in passing, it piqued our interest, and at Michelle at A Geek Girl’s Guide seemed to enjoy what she played during her first look at the demo.

indiemurderbynumbers

Murder By Numbers first hit our radar when we heard that Masakazu Sugimori was composing the soundtrack. Considering how much we adore his work from the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney series, we knew we eventually had to pick this up. Starring a pair of amateur detectives — one a former actress, the other an amnesiac robot — it sounds like something we’d enjoy, especially with all the praise that the game got from Adventure Rules!

indielaterdaters2

Later Daters was a game Rachel came across completely by accident. When making a list of indie games to buy, she looked up other visual novel games and found this on Steam. Thinking it would be a game to try for later when on the Nintendo eShop, it popped up. So, we bought this too.

indiespeeddateghost

Speed Dating for Ghosts is a game Rachel found, although she can’t remember where she heard it from. Promptly forgetting about the game (unfortunately, a lot of games slip through the cracks that way), Rachel came across a tweet from Hannie at the Hannie Corner, who was playing the game. It immediately went back on the list of games to buy and try.

What games have you bought recently? Have you played any of these? Let us know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around!

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Animal Crossing: New Horizons [Video Game Review]

Video Game Review: Animal Crossing New Horizons | Nintendo Switch | Animal Crossing | Nintendo | Video Games | Gaming | Game Review | DoublexJump.com

Title: Animal Crossing: New Horizons
Developer: Nintendo
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform: 
Nintendo Switch
Category:
Simulation
Release Date:
March 20, 2020
How I got the game:
I pre-ordered a digital copy from the Nintendo Switch eShop

 

 

 

Guys. Animal Crossing: New Horizons is here. I mean, it’s been here for a month now, but… it’s here and we can actually play it.

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I have to say, I think Animal Crossing: New Horizons is the best Animal Crossing game yet. It’s been a month and, while I have skipped a day or two here and there, this game is hard not to put down and I’m addicted to it. Given to what’s going on in the rest of the world right now, I think Animal Crossing: New Horizons is exactly what we all needed at this time.

For the most part, this isn’t too much different from the previous games in the series. Yet, there are a lot of brand new features.

The point of Animal Crossing is that you move to a new village – or, in this case, a deserted island – and you build up your home, paying off your debt to Tom Nook. In order to make money, you can fish and catch bugs to sell, sell furniture, sell fossils, and the like. There’s a shop where you can buy furniture and other items for your home along with wallpaper and flooring. There’s a clothing store, a flower shop, and so much else to make your village and house your own. No to mention, helping out the museum by donating bugs, fish, art, and fossils.

In New Horizons, you start off on a deserted island that you build from scratch. The island has nothing but fish, bugs to catch, fruit trees, and rocks. Your house first starts off as a tent and the “shop” is a tent as well. Plus, it’s just you, Tom Nook and his two kids, and two villagers. With that said, you’re building a brand new place for people to live. You’re not just concerned about your own home, but the island in its entirety.

You can collect materials such as tree branches, stones, various types of wood, and iron nuggets to craft an abundance of items. These items are tools such as a bug net, fishing pole, shovel, and more. Plus, you can create furniture and other items that you can use to decorate your house or your island. Which is another difference between New Horizons and previous Animal Crossing games – not only do you collect materials and craft things yourself, you can use those items to decorate the whole island.

Now you need to worry about which couch to place in your living room and where to put a picnic table outside.

I love gathering materials and crafting items. It really adds a lot more depth to the game and gives you more to do on a daily basis rather than constantly fishing and catching bugs just to sell to pay off your house or buy things from the store to decorate your home. I have to say though, my favorite new feature is being able to decorate outside of your home and the whole island. I have a plastic kiddie pool in New Leaf that’s in the middle of my living room and it makes absolutely no sense. Now, I have that same plastic kiddie pool in front of Astrid’s house – she’s a kangaroo and I’m sure the little tyke in her pouch would love to go for a swim.

Speaking of things to do, a new feature called Nook Miles has been added. These are achievements for the game. Nook Miles+ is something extra which are daily achievements. Once you reach one, a new one will appear. It makes it so that when you’re playing and you’ve already hit all your rocks and shaken all your trees but don’t necessarily feel like farming fish or bugs for money, you can take a look at some achievements to do in order to gain Nook Miles.

Nook Miles is sort of a reward point system from Tom Nook. You can use these miles to buy certain DIY recipes for crafting or other furniture for your house and island. You can also use these miles to go on Mystery Island Tours. Similar to the island in New Leaf, you can head to another deserted island at random. This is a way for you to gain extra materials. There are rocks to hit and trees to shake. Sometimes, the weather will be different on these random islands than what’s currently happening on your island and you’ll be able to catch different bugs or fish.

All the mystery islands are randomly generated and no two are alike – or so I’m told – however, there are different kinds of islands you can come across. For example, the bamboo island will have bamboo trees for collecting. You can take them back to your island with you and farm bamboo for DIY crafts. The most common island is one that looks normal with your native fruit. The next most common, but rarer than that, is a regular island that has fruit trees that are not your native fruit. There’s also tarantula island, money rock island, and a few more.

On these islands, if you have space and have a house for sale on your own island, you can run into one villager. You can either invite this villager to live on your island or leave them behind. I think this is a pretty cool feature because there are nearly 400 animal villagers to move into your island and you can only have ten. I’ve always loved how random the villagers were, never knowing who you’re going to get, and always hoping for that one special villager. With this, you can pick and choose. It’s still random so if you’re looking for a specific guy, you could be searching for a bit.

The villagers have always been my favorite part about Animal Crossing and now they’re better than ever. They have more dialogue (not much, but still more), they have more emotion behind their words (the reactions do help though), and they do more than just aimlessly wander around. They eat donuts, sit under the trees, run like Sonic, sing… it’s great. Plus, the higher your friendship with them, the more they’ll interact with you and say more things. It’s great.

Speaking of villagers and friends, it’s so easy to have friends over to your island. You can invite anyone locally or via online. If your Switch friends have the game, you can just invite them instead of opening your gates to the world. Also, when you invite someone, you can become best friends with them and there’s an option to only open gates for your best friends. On the flip side, you can use a code to only invite certain people in. Just in case you’re not feeling very social but someone wants to sell their turnips because you have a better price that day, you can use a code to let that person in only.

The best feature of all though? If you’re best friends with someone, you can mail them letters. And it gets to them immediately. I can’t thank Nintendo enough for that one.

Overall, I have little complaints about Animal Crossing: New Horizons. I guess I would say I wish you can craft multiple things at once. I made a bunch of birdhouses one day because it the hot item at Nook’s Cranny and I had to build them one by one. If you have the materials in your pocket, it should ask how many you want to make. Although, I can live without that. It’s really just a nit-pick because I honestly can’t find anything else wrong with this game.

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I mean, really… what can I say about the graphics and music? No matter what I say, it won’t do them justice. The music, as always, is great. It’s relaxing and calm but catchy. Animal Crossing was always known for its hourly music and also depending on the in-game weather and, for some reason, you need to unlock the hourly music. I don’t mind this and it doesn’t take long to unlock it at all. I just don’t understand why they made it something that needed to be unlocked.

The sound effects are a huge plus as well. It was always satisfying but now you can hear and see the wind blowing through the trees and your character’s hair. You can hear the ocean waves when you’re at the beach and listen to the waterfall. The positional audio is a nice touch as well.

As for the graphics, the villagers look so good. They look much more realistic than they ever did before. They have some texture to them – not a lot, but enough to make it noticeable and for it to look good.

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I’m going to be playing this game for the rest of my life. I may get to the point where I don’t check the island every single day, but… I’ll play it for the rest of my life, yes.

Animal Crossing: New Horizons gets…
5 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let me know in the comments! 

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First Impressions: Animal Crossing New Horizons

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

I’m a month late to the party, but I did recently buy and download Animal Crossing New Horizons for myself to see if all the hype around the game lived up to my expectations. So far, it’s not that bad at all.

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The Animal Crossing franchise has always been associated with Rachel more than me. When it comes to laid-back, slice-of-life simulation games, I leaned more towards the Harvest Moon series and, now, Stardew Valley. Ever since the first GameCube Animal Crossing game, it wasn’t something that was for me.

I never minded the games. I’ve tried my hand at a few of them, like the original and New Leaf for the 3DS. The original had been cute, a novelty, with the villagers roaming around and being able to share a town with other people in the family was interesting. Rachel and I used to send each other the occasional letter and it was always amusing to hear the animal villagers ask us about each other. Yet, the idea of collecting bugs and fish in order to dwindle your debt just to expand your house for a collection of random items wasn’t my cup of tea.

Rachel has always been the collector. It’s one reason why she enjoyed Super Mario Odyssey more than I did, despite the game’s praise. It didn’t impress me as much as all the critics claimed it would. While collecting would always be a staple in the Animal Crossing series, having something other to focus on was one reason why I thought maybe I wouldn’t mind New Leaf that much.

For a while, New Leaf was fun. Being the mayor of the town and having a few ways to improve the place gave me a few more goals, but I didn’t continue playing it much after the challenge Rachel and I had given each other that enticed me to play it in the first place. Still, I made an effort, but even in my conclusion post for that challenge, I mention how I will leave the Switch version of Animal Crossing to Rachel.

Within this past week, I caved and bought New Horizons for my Switch Lite. I’m not even a week into the game and I’m already enjoying it more than the previous installments that I’ve tried. I’m quite conscious that this could be due to “shiny new game,” but there are plenty of mechanics that I don’t mind.

The crafting is fun, although I would love some sort of durability indicator to let me know when my fishing rod and the like are going to poof out of existence. It allows me to strategize, figure out which of my supplies I’m going to use to craft tools or if I should save them for something else and just buy the flimsy versions of the tools from Nook’s Cranny as a temporary fix. DIY recipes is also a type of collection I can get behind, especially since I also just unlocked the customization feature. Here’s hoping there’s more to the customization rather than just changing the crafted items’ colors.

The Nook Miles is an interesting mechanic as well, and I’m rather amused at Tom Nook having his own brand in the shopping network. Earning Nook Miles allows me to have goals while working towards them at my own pace, something that I enjoy in games like Harvest Moon and Stardew Valley. There’s always something to strive for on the horizon, but there’s no rush to get there.

The other main aspect about this game that I like is the co-op modes, both locally and online. Considering I’m not far into the game at all, I haven’t yet had the chance to visit anyone’s islands or have anyone come to my own little place — no, not even Rachel — but seeing how excited everyone else is about it, I’m looking forward to it. I would just like to make my island a little more presentable before opening it to others, haha!

Honestly, what really changed my mind about getting the game was watching and listening to Rachel as she spontaneously joined Jett from In Third Person on his island to try to tag-team the fishing tourney together for more points.

I’m still a new kid to this franchise and, even though I’ve only been playing for a handful of days — and even some of those days were just for an hour or so at night — I’m hopeful that I’ll continue to enjoy New Horizons for a little while longer.

How are you enjoying New Horizons? Any game that made you change your mind about a franchise? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX [Video Game Review]

Video Game Review: Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Rescue Team DX | Nintendo | Nintendo Switch | Pokemon | Pokemon Mystery Dungeon | Game Review | DoublexJump.com

Title: Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform: 
Nintendo Switch
Category: 
Role-Playing, Adventure
Release Date:
March 6, 2020
How I got the game:
I pre-ordered a digital copy from the Nintendo Switch eShop

 

 

 

For years I’ve been wanting another Pokemon Mystery Dungeon game. I would have loved to have a brand new game, but having a remaster of the original Pokemon Mystery Dungeons felt like playing a whole new game anywhere. I’m happy they haven’t forgotten about the Mystery Dungeon series.

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You turn into a Pokemon without having any memory other than the fact that you once were a human. You don’t know how you got to the Pokemon world or why you were turned into a Pokemon in the first place. You wake up from another Pokemon, your partner Pokemon, and together, you unravel the mystery as to who you were before and why you turned into a Pokemon in the first place.

All the while, you start a rescue team with this Pokemon. You go into mystery dungeons to help other Pokemon in need. Meanwhile, natural disasters are happening all over the Pokemon world. You head out on an adventure to find out what’s causing them and how to get them to stop. This involves tracking down certain legendary Pokemon and not only battling them, but asking for their help.

You’ll soon find out that you’re connected with these natural disasters, but… I won’t say anymore due to spoilers in case you’ve never played the original games (or simply forgot, as I did).

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The game begins with a fun quiz to determine what kind of Pokemon you are. These questions are simple since the game is generally targeted at a younger age anyway. Most of them are “what would you do” situations with multiple choice answers. Taking the quiz was always one of my favorite parts of playing the game. Your result will share some personality information about you depending on your answers and, most of the time, it’s pretty accurate.

This time around, I was a Torchic, which is fitting. I always go for the fire starters so I didn’t mind being a fire-type Pokemon. Then you get to choose your partner Pokemon, of a different type. So, all the fire-type Pokemon were taken away from my choices. I ended up choosing Psyduck – he’s one of my favorites.

Then the game officially begins with you waking up on the beach and your partner finding you, poking you, to wake you up. As the two of you get slightly acquainted, you’re interrupted by a Butterfree worried about her baby Caterpie, who is lost in a mystery dungeon somewhere. Thus, you and your partner Pokemon go on their first adventure.

This is a tutorial, showing you how to play the game. You’re in front with your partner Pokemon behind you. However, in this version, you can switch the leader. So, if you wanted to play as your partner, you could have him be the “leader” thus switching roles. Whoever the leader is, the partner will follow behind and, if an enemy Pokemon gets too close, they’ll attack. You can tell your partner what to do by either having them go off on their own (which will show you more of the map and help you find where the stairs are faster), have them run when an enemy is nearby (which is useful when their health is low), or have them attack when they see an enemy. I personally had them always attack because it made it easier for me and it made it seem like the AI was smarter in that sense.

Each dungeon is randomly generated. The map appears as you enter new rooms and hallways, however, you can see where enemies (represented by a red dot) and items (represented by a blue dot) are. The stairs are hidden until you enter the room where the stairs are and then you’ll see a white square appear on the map. If you need to rescue a Pokemon or have to find an item for a Pokemon, that’s represented by a light blue dot and, once you reach the floor of your destination, the game will tell you so you don’t accidentally move onto the next floor. Once you go up or down the stairs, there’s no going back.

Each area has a certain number of floors. The farther you are in the game, the longer the dungeons are. However, these dungeons are quick for the most part and (fairly) easy to get through. A lot can happen in the dungeons other than searching for the Pokemon you need to rescue or for the stairs to keep moving forward. Something new added in this game that wasn’t in the original is that sometimes you’ll find fainted Pokemon in the dungeons. If you give them an apple, they’ll be revived and ask to join your team.

Allowing other Pokemon to join your team isn’t a new feature. However, if I remember correctly, you could have teams of four (including yourself) and only add one or two more Pokemon to trail behind you if you find new recruits on your journey. In this version, you can only have teams of three (but can create multiple sets of teams) and you can recruit up to five or six Pokemon. (I believe. I honestly forget the right number.)

Once the job is complete, you can either exit the dungeon right away or continue until you reach the highest floor. If I was in good shape, I often continued until I finished the whole dungeon so I could collect more items and battle more Pokemon to earn experience points.

Yes, just like any other Pokemon game, you earn experience points after defeating a Pokemon. You level up, boosting you stats, and ultimately, being able to evolve. However, evolution only unlocks once you beat the main story. I don’t understand why, but that’s the way it is.

Aside from the main story, your rescue team can accept rescue jobs. After completing a job, you’ll earn rank points. Leveling up your rank gives you team a boost such as being able to accept more jobs, unlocking new areas, and – the best part – having more inventory space.

I have a great time with this game. My only complaint about it is that I wish it were longer. Sure, you can continue to play the game once the main story is over. (The main should take less than 20 hours to complete.) However, I would have loved to see more meat for the story and have the opportunity to do more. Plus, my Pokemon and partner were around level 30 when I beat the main story. A main Pokemon game needs to have your team in the 60s or so when you beat the main story. I would have liked to further them a bit more before defeating the final boss.

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After playing Pokemon Blue Mystery Dungeon and Pokemon Red Mystery Dungeon on the Game Boy Color and Game Boy Advance respectively, it was great to see the Pokemon Mystery Dungeon in HD glory with crisp graphics on the Nintendo Switch. Other than remastering the graphics, I don’t think they wanted to stray too far from the Mystery Dungeon graphics that we all know, love, and easily recognize. This was fine with me. I think it worked.

As for music, the Pokemon Mystery Dungeon games were always on my favorite soundtracks list. The music in this game is, I’m pretty sure, the same as it was when the games originally came out. (Though remastered a bit, I’m sure). I love every bit of music in the game. The soundtrack is awesome. One of my favorite gaming soundtracks is Paper Mario from the Nintendo 64. The Pokemon Mystery Dungeon music is similar to Paper Mario, which I think it why I love it so much. It’s always so catchy.

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I can see myself going back to this game. I hoped there would have been more than one save file unlike the original games, but alas, there’s still just the one save file. However, on the Nintendo Switch, if you have multiple profiles you can easily restart the game without deleting your original playthrough. Whether you start it over or not, there are other things to do in the game once you beat the main story. You can still take on jobs and level up your Pokemon. I’m sure I’ll pick this one back up again in the future, especially while I wait for either another Mystery Dngeon remake or a brand new Pokemon Mystery Dungeon game for the Switch.

Pokemon Mystery Dungeon: Rescue Team DX gets…
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let me know in the comments! 

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Journey to Pokemon Home

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Monday, everyone!

I finally got Pokemon Home and gave it a whirl over this weekend. My first main experiment was to see how many Pokemon from some of my old favorite teams could go to the Galar region!

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Right before the weekend, I finally got Pokemon Home. It’s been out for about three weeks now — February 11 —  and I honestly kind of kept forgetting about it until recently. The successor to Pokemon Bank, Home is both a mobile and Nintendo Switch app for Pokemon storage. While there is a basic, free plan for Home, there are so many more options and storage for your Pokemon with the paid plan. Considering the paid plan is only 15 or so bucks a year, it’s not too bad. If you’re an avid Pokemon collector, it’s well worth it.

When I turned on Pokemon Home, I gave it a test run to see how it works and was greeted with this dude:

grandoak
I’ll admit, I was a bit startled.

After doing all the updates that were necessary for my original 3DS, I booted up Pokemon Bank to see if I even still had Pokemon in there. I had about half a box of legendary Pokemon that I received throughout special events during past years, so I figured they would be the first residents for Home.

pokeboy
This little guy popped up once and then I never saw him again. I wonder how well this would have gone if Nintendo gave this job to the Pokeball Guy from Sword/Shield…

The process was simple enough, although it was interesting trying to juggle both my 3DS and my Switch Lite on my desk. During the move from Bank to Home, you need to input a Moving Key and have a limited amount of time to do so. Once the key is accepted, it takes a few good minutes for the Pokemon to move from Bank to Home, a progress during which you cannot use the software. It was nice to see the Pokemon in Home, and once you connect your Sword/Shield game to Home, the software allows you to easily move the Pokemon from Home to the boxes in Sword/Shield.

If Sword/Shield allows the Pokemon, that is. Conveniently, Home has icons that indicate whether or not a Pokemon can move from Home to Sword/Shield. Hopefully, there will eventually be DLC or a patch that allows more Pokemon in Sword/Shield, but for now it’ll be interesting to see which Pokemon from my past teams will be able to join my Rillaboom and company in Galar.

So I grabbed my Y version and got to work.

As a bit of background, my Y version is probably my Pokemon game with the most time sunk into it. I have a little over 210 hours on my Y version — first started on December 25, 2013 and I entered the Hall of Fame for the first time a mere three days later — compared to the almost 80 hours on my Sword version. While I don’t have my Y Pokedex complete, I have spent the majority of those hours collecting my favorite Pokemon to recreate my preferred teams from generations 1 through 5 to go alongside my generation 6 team from Kalos:

20200229_1419083063152149252412844.jpg
Here are all my babies! 

Including my main Kalos team on the right, all these Pokemon were raised up to level 100 with the help of a plethora of Elite Four runs as well as challenges from the Battle Chateau.

It’s a bit bittersweet to think about, actually. Pokemon Bank, which came out in 2014 for the Americas, was first used to allow me to gather all of these Pokemon for the then-current Pokemon game so I could have all my favorites together. Now, Pokemon Bank will help me move all of these guys to Pokemon Home where we’ll see just how many of them I can bring to Galar.

Considering how much of a soft spot I have for my Y version, I was honestly considering breeding and hatching eggs of these guys to then move into Home. However, I realized that it’s been literally a year and a half since I last turned on Y. Case in point was a poor Eevee that was apparently stuck in an egg since July 2018. Instead, I spent a little time to get said eggs, but decided that the baby-versions of my favorites will remain behind in Y while the adults will travel to Home.

20200301_1751148045355633298730841.jpg
SO. MANY. EGGS. Featuring Brady the Shiny Butterfree, who had been my first encounter/capture in Y as a little Caterpie.

If and when I decide to return to Pokemon Y, I’ll have a grand time hatching and raising my favorite Pokemon again, which is one of the best parts of these games.

With all the eggs created, it was time to actually move my teams to Pokemon Bank then to Home. I decided to just move my teams from generations 1 through 5 first; I haven’t quite figured out if I will leave my original Kalos team in Y and create eggs of them for Home and Galar, or if I will eventually also move my original Kalos team over as well. My Alola team will be for another time and day.

pokemonhome
Quite a difference between this screenshot and the previous cell phone pic of them all in Y, huh?

It didn’t take long at all for a box of 30 Pokemon to move from Pokemon Bank to Home. In fact, I’m sure it took a few minutes longer for Bank to actually just load up on my 3DS. It was rather exciting to see most of my favorites with updated sprites in Home!

Now the big test was to see just how many of them could be moved into Sword. I’ll be honest, I was a bit disappointed with the results:

pokemonhome3

It was disheartening to see all of the glaring, red, “do not transport” symbols amid all of my favorites, particularly with the starter Pokemon (I want my Grovyle!). After separating the Pokemon that could go to Sword from the ones who are staying in Home, 13 out of 30 — almost half — of my trained Pokemon can visit Galar. Yet, the only true new Pokemon that can join me is my Venusaur (unless you count the pink Gastrodon, since I’ve only seen the blue version of the Pokemon in Sword); considering my Galar pokedex is complete, I have all the other Pokemon in my box already, albeit not as trained as the ones from Y.

Not only are the majority of my teams unable to come to Galar, some of the ones who can join me don’t have all of their moves available. The Pokemon with an exclamation point beside them indicate that at least one of their moves cannot be used in Sword/Shield, which I didn’t even think about but in hindsight wasn’t surprising. I expected the moves that weren’t available in Sword/Shield to just disappear from my Pokemon’s move pools, but apparently you need to do that yourself, if you read the moves’ descriptions:

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I never realized “Return” wasn’t in Sword/Shield until this happened, to be honest. “Flash,” “Hidden Power,” and “Flame Burst” were the other moves, in case anyone was curious.

I was initially hesitant to do this move with my teams generations 1 through 5 because I was afraid most of my favorite Pokemon would be forced to retire, so to speak, in Pokemon Home. I can’t move the rest of my teams back to Bank to bring them back in Y. All those Pokemon that I spent over 200 hours raising for battles are now stuck in Home.

To be honest, it’s okay that these Pokemon are retired. It was a startling realization that I hadn’t visited my Y game in well over a year, and at least I now have my favorites with me on my Switch Lite. With that said, Nintendo, I would love a feature in Pokemon Home reminiscent of My Pokemon Ranch — give me a mode where I can see all of my Pokemon milling about together, maybe even give me the ability to pat them or give them little treats here and there, please!

This move from Y to Bank to Home to Sword answered some questions, but also brought up new ones. Do I need to wait until the expansion pass in June for the pokedex to fully expand to bring over more of my teams? Or, considering this is a mere 30 Pokemon out of almost-900, are my particular favorites unlucky enough to be left out of the additional 200 Pokemon that are joining the Galar region? I know the Alolan starter Pokemon are invited to Galar — are the majority of the 200 additional Pokemon from Alola as well? Perhaps we’ll see when I decide to go through my Pokemon from my Moon games along with other Pokemon from Kalos.

In the meantime, I’ll be back in Pokemon Sword where I will be hard at work leveling up my Sword team to level 100 to match some of their veteran teammates.

What do you think of Pokemon Home? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Layton’s Mystery Journey: Katrielle and the Millionaires’ Conspiracy [Video Game Review]

Lady Layton | Professor Layton | Video Games | Gaming | Nintendo Switch | Doublexjump.com

Title: Layton’s Mystery Journey: Katrielle and the Millionaires’ Conspiracy
Publisher: Level-5
Developer: Level-5
Platform: 
iOS, Android, Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo Switch
Category:
Puzzle, Adventure
Release Date: 
July 20, 2017 (iOS, Android), October 6, 2017 (Nintendo 3DS), November 8, 2019 (Nintendo Switch)
How we got the game:
Received it for Christmas 2019 on the Nintendo Switch

krismii
Layton’s Mystery Journey — or Lady Layton, as we’ve been calling it — has been a game that’s been on our radar since it was announced for the 3DS. We’ve enjoyed the few Professor Layton games we’ve played, and we were looking forward to seeing what Lady Layton was all about.

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Lady Layton, of course, is not Professor Layton himself. However, we enjoy the puzzles and characters so we were interested in seeing how Lady Layton presented herself after playing so much Professor Layton.

Gameplay | Video Game Reviews | Video Games | Gaming | Blogging | DoublexJump.com

krismii
Lady Layton has similar gameplay mechanics as the Professor Layton series. Navigating through different scenes, you point and click on the environment to interact with objects and people, finding clues to the current mystery as well as short puzzles that bolster the gameplay. While you don’t directly control the main character’s movements, you are able to go between scenes via the handy map.

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All you need is the ability to point-and-click with your Joy-Con and have enough brain power to solve some puzzles. Lady Layton is part visual novel where the characters interact. We took turns reading dialogue from certain characters though some parts were voice-acted with a short anime cut scene here and there.

 krismii
That’s pretty much all there is to the gameplay mechanics. Some puzzles include literally rotating pieces to solve them, others include more mathematics, and still some are more logic puzzles. Aside from the puzzles and main storylines, there are also a plethora of minigames that tie in to the few cases — puzzles that have to do with shopping or food or Sherl the canine sidekick — as well as a wardrobe change function for Katrielle. We didn’t really explore these options too much, to be honest, as we weren’t too interested in them.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I play the Layton games mostly for the puzzles. In this particular game, however, the puzzles were too easy. Normally there are puzzles we get stuck on and need to use our hint coins a lot or rope our parents in to help us. The majority of the puzzles in this game we breezed right there. There were only a handful of puzzles we got stuck on.

krismii
We did feel a bit more bored by the majority of the puzzles than we have in other Professor Layton games, yes. This game felt like there was a lot more fluff rather than substance when it came to the actual gameplay.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Yes, it was pretty light-hearted for the most part. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing. I enjoyed the banter between the characters. Overall, though, the main gameplay could have issued a little more of a challenge for me.

Graphics & Music | Video Game Reviews | Video Games | Gaming | Blogging | DoublexJump.com

krismii
The graphics of the game are cute, the same style that has been used for previous Professor Layton games to keep them connected. While some of the more exaggerated designs for characters I could do without, the art style is engaging and keeps me interested in continuing the story.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I enjoy the art style. I think it’s charming overall. There are certainly some interesting looking people but it’s fun nonetheless.

krismii
The music for this game is cozy. Relaxing and soft, the tunes do well being paired with the characters — the main cast being comprised of a gentlewoman and her eager, polite assistant — and the locations of the game. I enjoyed the music, but it was low-key for a game about solving crimes.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I agree that it was low-key for a crime-solving game. Then again, none of the “crimes” were dire so it seemed as though the music fit. Lady Layton is a fairly light-hearted game. The music was catchy regardless though.
Story | Video Game Reviews | Video Games | Gaming | Blogging | DoublexJump.com

krismii
The title of this game is Katrielle and The Millionaires’ Conspiracy, which gives one the impression that there is a larger, overarching story amid the multiple cases that this game provides. Within the dozen cases that the game provides, the “millionaires” are introduced but there is no larger case that you are always trying to discover. Each case is individual before it brings all the characters together during the last case of the game.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I don’t mind having multiple cases throughout the game. Having 12 cases to solve seems fun. However, other than the characters, none of the cases had anything to do with… anything, really. The cases introduced the characters but never hinted at a bigger conspiracy until the final case. Even then, the solution seemed out of the blue.

krismii
The solution both seemed like it came out of the blue, but it wasn’t particularly surprising either. We had guessed who the true culprit was before the answer came about and, even now, there are parts of the last case that don’t make sense to me for the culprit to be who they were. The story could have been a lot stronger when it came to the characters. The characters themselves were interesting enough, but there wasn’t enough of a plot to really show their strengths.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Not to mention that Sherl, a talking dog, approached Kat the beginning of the game wondering who he was and how he got turned into a dog. Supposedly, he was human at one time and has no memory. That mystery was never answered. After the credits, it hinted at a sequel, but I would have liked more mention of that. Once he initially asked for her help figuring out who he is, his “case” was never mentioned again throughout the entire game.

Replay Value | Video Game Reviews | Video Games | Gaming | Blogging | DoublexJump.com

krismii
The cases themselves are fairly linear, with the one outcome each. Likewise, the puzzles usually only have a couple of ways to reach the answers as well, if they have more than one way to the outcome in the first place. The only replayability this game may have is if the player missed some puzzles and wanted to go and find them again. There are some minigames to play as well but nothing that we found particularly striking.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I’m not sure if this is a game I’d pick up again. The puzzles were fun but pretty easy compared to the Professor Layton games. The mini-games weren’t great and overall, each case didn’t allow you to solve it alongside Kat. It made some parts boring. The game was okay overall and the characters were certainly enjoyable.

Layton’s Mystery Journey: Katrielle and the Millionaires’ Conspiracy gets…
Video game review: 3 Lives
3 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

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Nintendo Switch Online Wish List

Nintendo Switch | Online | Nintendo | Video Games | Gaming | Doublexjump.com

krismii
I’ll admit that we do not use the Nintendo Switch online services as often as we probably should considering we’re paying for it. I forget that it exists, to be honest. The idea of the catalog is wonderful, especially since we have good friends that we can’t play local co-op with, but there haven’t been too many games that we’re interested in playing just yet.

rachmii
The idea of the Nintendo Switch Online is a good idea in theory. However, a lot of the games we already own and can still play on our past consoles. Not to mention Nintendo released the SNES and NES Classic consoles so… it’s all sort of redundant.

krismii
I would like to see more SNES and NES games that are not on the Classic consoles offered with revamped online multiplayer if such a mode is applicable. Online Turtles in Time, anyone? I’m also hoping that some Nintendo 64 games will make their way onto the online service. I really think there should have been an online multiplayer mode for games like Super Mario Party. Imagine playing the original Mario Party games online!

rachmii
The NES and SNES were great consoles, but I really think the Nintendo 64 was the peak of it all. I’m surprised there hasn’t been a Nintendo 64 Classic or even games from that console added to the Switch online. It would be awesome to play through the old Mario Party games, especially since some of those games were never added to the virtual console on the Wii or Wii U.

krismii
I hope they’re thinking of adding Nintendo 64 games onto the Online service in the long run, as I believe Nintendo is adamant that there is not going to be an N64 Classic anytime soon. And, of course, the online service isn’t all bad. We would never be able to play Pokemon Sword and Shield or Smash Ultimate with each other and friends if not for the online service. Still, I wish there was more incentive than that to pay for using the Internet while gaming.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Well, the games that were added are games that we never played as kids. We don’t have much interest in trying some of them too. We should broaden our horizons, but we don’t. On the flip side, the games that we did play as kids, such as Turtles in Time, aren’t there.

krismii
We should explore the options a bit more, admittedly. I wonder how the Switch Online service is for those who do remember playing the currently available games? Perhaps because we don’t have as much nostalgia for the games is why we don’t care for the Online service, with the exception of the occasional Pokemon battle or Smash match with online friends.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
That’s true. We were pretty young in the era of the NES and SNES. This is all the more reason as to why I would love to have some Nintendo 64 games on there. I’d be playing those all the time. Still, we definitely need to explore the games that are already on there a bit more.

Do you use the Nintendo Switch Online services often? What would you like to see on there? Let us know in the comments below. If you liked this post, please share it around!

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Friday Favorites: Remastered for the Switch Wish List

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday everyone!

The Nintendo Switch’s popularity has lent itself to getting plenty of older games that were remastered for the latest console. Link’s Awakening, Spyro Reignited Trilogy, Assassin’s Creed III, Resident Evil 4 are just a few among many. With that said, there are a few older games that I wouldn’t mind buying again if it meant they were remastered for the Nintendo Switch.

Nintendo Switch | Remastered | Video Games | Gaming | Nintendo | Doublexjump.com

Super Mario RPG: Legend of the Seven Stars

If this game were to ever get a remaster, I hope the copyright issues between Nintendo and Square Enix wouldn’t be a problem with the partnerships that the two companies have had recently. Super Mario RPG is probably my favorite game of all time, with nostalgia being a heavy reason, and I would love to see it get polished up for the Switch. True, it’s on the SNES Classic, but that doesn’t quite have the portability of the Switch.

Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword

The first Fire Emblem game to make it over to North America, I would be delighted to get the chance to play this game. Years ago, after I had been introduced to the series with Sacred Stones and the Path of Radiance, my parents somehow found a copy of Blazing Sword to gift me. Unfortunately, it was a used copy with a dying internal battery; it wouldn’t save my files. Still, I was stubborn enough to reach at least the end of Lyn’s story, keeping my GameBoy on and charging all the while. Blazing Sword was available for the Wii U virtual console, and I had downloaded it onto there as well. Yet, I still didn’t get the chance to beat it, not with life obligations and our poor Wii U’s battery not lasting as long as it used to, either. With the revival of the series thanks to Awakening, the popularity of Three Houses, and the fact that remakes of older games have been proven successful with Shadows of Valentia, I think Blazing Sword would be an excellent contender to be remastered for the Switch.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time

Technically (and apparently, since I just learned this), Turtles in Time already had a remastered version ten years ago called Re-Shelled, but it wasn’t on a Nintendo console. Since Turtles in Time was ported to the SNES so long ago, I would love to see it again on the Switch with both local and online co-op options. Even if the game is one day brought over to the Switch Online library and allows me to play with both Rachel and friends across country borders, I’ll be happy! (That will also give me more incentive to use the Switch Online service that I pay yearly for.)

Mario Party 1 through 3

Remember the Mario Party Top 100 game and how it was not what everyone expected it to be? Instead of having fun board games to go with the best mini-games throughout the franchise, it had one small board with watered down rules? I firmly believe Nintendo could have done much better if they had just remastered Mario Party 1 through 3 rather than make the Top 100 game. Considering the success Nintendo had with Super Mario Party, I think they would do well in remastering the first few games of the franchise for the Nintendo Switch.

What are some games you’d like to see remastered for the Nintendo Switch? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Being Social with Video Games

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Monday, everyone!

I hope everyone is doing well with the holidays in full force this week! My holiday has been a little strange this year, with going back and forth between family and a couple of dogs.

Video Games | Gaming | Social Media | Nintendo | Nintendo Switch | Switch Lite | Doublexjump.com

I originally planned on this post being one last game review for the year. Due to life and the timing of everything, that obviously didn’t happen.

The holidays have been a little strange this year. Neither Rachel nor I are home since we’re both dogsitting for different families. We’re going back and forth home, of course, for Christmas Eve and Christmas day, but it’s still strange.

I have two puppies upset that my lap isn’t big enough for both of them as I write this. They’re wonderful dogs, a couple of regular goofs, but it is quiet going from a full house to being the only English-speaking individual in a place. When I’m with the dogs, the time slows, and I’m looking forward to returning to my own family for any festivities, but the time goes by so quickly when I’m with them.

Rachel and I were a little hesitant to each get our own Switch Lite — I mean, we knew we would because it’s Nintendo, but we weren’t sure they were needed — and I’m honestly really thankful for them. Despite both of us being apart, they were able to hold onto their wifi connections enough for us to trade between our Sword and Shield games while we were texting each other.

Traditionally, Rachel and I would spend the day after Christmas in whatever new pajamas we happened to receive and play video games together. This is the first time in our lives we will not be able to do that while sitting next to each other, but Nintendo still has our backs. With the portability of our Switch Lites, and the power of other social media, we’ll still be able to play together.

It’s a stark contrast to the “moms” I hear in the office. I’m probably the only gamer in the building, to be honest, but I’ve heard the “adulter adults” who lament that the youth in their lives that only want video games and electronics for Christmas. It’s a shame that they don’t do a bit more research about the current video game industry, how it’s more social than ever before (among other benefits).

There was another article I read fairly recently about how proud a mom was that she doesn’t let her son play Fortnite, but did question whether he was missing out on social benefits from the game, considering his friends all enjoyed it. And, while Fortnite isn’t my cup of tea, I think he was missing out. Of course, it’s a double-edged sword — the woman had a video game-free house and when the friends came over, they got over their initial bafflement of no video games and enjoyed games that didn’t need to be plugged into an outlet.

Would the child have gained friends a little quicker if he had some time to play Fortnite? Perhaps. Are video games hindering social and creative skills? Absolutely not.

Because, personally, without the portability and the social aspect of the Switch Lite, I’d be a bit lonely over the holidays. I’m still connected with some of my best friends because of it.

Who are you able to connect with that you wouldn’t be able to otherwise thanks to video games? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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