Flashback Friday: Golden Sun

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

The year is three-quarters over, and there are about ninety days left until Christmas. Isn’t that crazy?

Golden Sun | Video Games | Gaming | Nintendo | Game Boy | Doublexjump.com

Golden Sun is a game that I need to play again. I never actually owned it, but I remember a friend lending it to me sometime in sixth grade. She scolded me at one point when I told her where I was in the story and what level I was at. Apparently I wasn’t keeping up with my characters’ levels while advancing the story!

This game was released for the Game Boy Advance in 2001, and the RPG was critically acclaimed, getting almost perfect reviews. It was traditional for the genre in which the players controlled four characters in a party and traveled throughout a fantasy land as they advance the story. Like most RPGs, there is a magic system, with Golden Sun’s magic being based on the classical elements. The magic is called Psynergy and wielders are Adepts. However, the magic that is involved in the game is also used outside of battle for solving puzzles. Instead of playing completely linear, players are allowed to return to previous locations to solve puzzles they couldn’t before after unlocking the magic needed to do so.

Golden Sun also employed little creatures called Djinn. Djinn are found in the world and can be set to a character, helping with the character’s magic and class, among other attributes. Djinn have their own elements and can be mixed and matched when put with a character, offering a wide variety of spells and effects for battles.

I honestly don’t remember too much of this game, but I do remember that I enjoyed the game enough to ask for Golden Sun: Dark Dawn when that had been released for the Nintendo DS back in 2010. With that said, I haven’t played too much of Dark Dawn. Perhaps I should rectify that…

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: The Little Mermaid

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

July is almost over and, with it, a little more than half of the year! What are you planning on doing for the rest of 2019? I hope you’ve been creating and meeting some awesome goals!

Video Games | The Little Mermaid | Gaming | Nintendo | NES | Doublexjump.com

There was plenty of buzz around the internet lately about the casting of the live-action The Little Mermaid. With all the talk of that upcoming movie, it reminded me of one of the few NES games that I remember having and occasionally playing.

The Little Mermaid was first released for the NES and the Gameboy July 19, 1991, a little over 28 years ago and just makes me feel really old. The game actually doesn’t follow the movie plot line. Instead, the opening sequence mentions that Ursula lived, somehow, and captured some of Ariel’s friends, so she tells Prince Eric, “I’ll be back later,” and turns back into a mermaid and swims off to rescue them.

There are only five levels for this game, most of which I do not remember. Really, I watched a small, 20-ish minute play through of it on YouTube and the only pull that I think this would have had for me as a kid was that it was Disney. It was simplistic in nature, but seeing the so-called story for the game also got me thinking about how Ariel just ditched Prince Eric — who she spent most of the movie getting — to save her friends. She showed initiative, which I thought was pretty cool before being a little mind-numbed by the gameplay.

Yet, if I find The Little Mermaid on Steam or on an emulator, I probably would give it another go just for the heck of it.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Tomodachi Life

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Guys, June is pretty much over. The year is half over. How have you all been doing? We’ve been going through our older games, figuring out games to return to amid all of the new releases that have been coming out lately.

Tomodachi Life | Video Games | Friday | Nintendo | Doublexjump.com

Tomodachi Life was a game that I was a bit skeptical of when I first heard about it. It sounded so silly but I was looking forward to it nonetheless. Anything else that we could do with the Miis was amusing to me.

Tomodachi Life came out for the 3DS in Japan in April 2013 and in 2014 for the rest of the world. It’s a simulation game where one has an island of Miis that can interact with each other. It’s not a gameplay-heavy game. Rather, you move various Miis onto the island where their personalities influence the activities they do, such as eating, collecting outfits, and developing relationships — both platonic and romantic — with each other. It had positive reviews, inspiring the mobile app Miitomo and, a few years later, Miitopia.

It’s actually a fun little game that I need to return to and see what my Miis are up to. I’m pretty sure my “look-alike” Mii is married and has kids. I’ve been thinking about the game lately, mainly because I’ve returned to Miitopia.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Link’s Awakening

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Can you believe that E3 is right around the corner? I’m looking forward to the many new games that are waiting to be announced or for new information to be shown on games that we already know are coming… such as a certain remake of a beloved Legend of Zelda game!

Flashback Friday | Legend of Zelda | Link's Awakening | Video Games | Doublexjump.com

Hailed as one of the best video games of all time, The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening was released in 1993 for the Game Boy and re-released in 1998 for the Game Boy Color. The game itself is unique in that it’s one of the few Legend of Zelda games that does not take place in Hyrule or feature Princess Zelda and the Triforce relic.

Admittedly, I never finished the game. It didn’t appeal to me the way Ocarina of Time did, being all 3D and on the big television screen. I tend to enjoy the console Legend of Zelda games more so than the handheld games. I enjoyed the game play and the little nods to the Mario franchise, with the Chain Chomp and the Yoshi doll, but Younger Kris was more interested in other games at that time.

Nevertheless, I’m looking forward to the Switch release of the game. Considering how little I’ve played of the original, this will be like a new Legend of Zelda game for me!

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Tiny Toon Adventures Buster Busts Loose

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Since Easter was last Sunday, I figured I would try to find a game that starred a rabbit. This old game is way back in the time of the SNES and was one of our favorites.

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Tiny Toon Adventures: Buster Busts Loose was a game released for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System way back in 1992 in Japan and 1993 in Europe and North America. It was developed and published by Konami, which also did plenty of other video games based on cartoon series, such as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Batman: the Animated Series.

Does anyone else remember Tiny Toons Adventures? We grew up with Looney Toons, mainly due to our older sister and our Uncle Kevin. Tiny Toons Adventures was such a clever cartoon to us, as we found it amusing how the likes of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and Elmer Fudd were teachers at a school for younger toons. Two of the main characters of the show were Buster and Babs. Many of the characters from the show are featured in this game, and it is Buster who is the main playable character.

This is a short and sweet side-scrolling platform — not that I remember ever finishing it, admittedly — with only about five or six levels depending on which difficulty you are playing. As Buster, you explore each level to get to the main objective, which changed from level to level. Looking this game up again was rather nostalgic, and I’m wondering if I’d be able to find it on an emulator somewhere just to give it another try.

Have you played this game? What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments below! If you liked this post, please share it around.

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Flashback Friday: Sonic Battle

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Hey, guys, with the end of March, 2019 is a quarter of the way over. Isn’t that kind of scary to think about? 

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Sonic the Hedgehog has an interesting reputation. The majority of people believe his earlier games are the best examples of the speedy hedgehog, but his later games seemed to do well enough for them to keep on coming. I was always a fan of the character, even if his games weren’t the best quality, and one of my favorite games that featured Sonic was Sonic Battle for the Gameboy Advance. Considering Sonic is known for his super speed, a fighting game starring the character was a bit unorthodox, but I found it fun.

Sonic Battle was released in Japan at the end of 2003 and North America and Europe at the beginning of 2004. It got mostly mixed reviews, with most of its fighting and arena aspects being praised but its story and some mechanics being criticized. The battles themselves were fought in 3D stages, each with their own design, while the characters themselves were 2D, reminding me briefly of the graphics in the Paper Mario series.

There were a plethora of characters, each with their own standard attacks and combos, as well as heavy attacks, air attacks, upper attacks, and aim attacks. Sonic’s attacks relied mostly on speed, Shadow had the use of Chaos Control in his combos, Knuckles was one of the heavier hitters, etc. One character, Emerl, is the most unique in the game. As an ancient Gizoid, Emerl has the ability to copy attacks from the other characters after engaging them in a fight. These attacks are represented as cards and the player can build a custom move-set for Emerl to use throughout the story. It gave the game some replayability, even with the linear storyline.

Still, it was fun. It had the characters I cared about in a light that wasn’t seen too often. Sonic Battle is one of the few Gameboy Advance games that, even to this day, I would play casually when given the chance.

Have you played Sonic Battle? What did you think of it?

Save the date! We’re doing a special Twitch Stream to celebrate the Nintendo Switch! You can learn more about it here.

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Flashback Friday: Super Mario All-Stars

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

Can you believe we’re already near the end of January? The first month of 2019 has flown right by us! Any old or leftover games from 2018 that you’re still trying to finish up?

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Super Mario All-Stars was released on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1993 and is a compiled collection of the Super Mario games that were available on the Nintendo Entertainment System. It includes Super Mario Bros., Super Mario Bros. 2, Super Mario Bros. 3, and Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, which actually wasn’t released outside of Japan aside from this compilation. While I was a bit too young to remember much of the NES, I have clear memories of All-Stars, enough so when we spotted the 2010 Wii port of the game at a GameStop, we nabbed it.

I mostly remember our older sister playing through some of the levels on the original Super Mario Bros. games and trying my hand at it occasionally when I was able to hold the controller. I wasn’t that great at the games then and, even with the Wii port, I’m still not great with them now. The Mario Bros. games have never been my favorites to play, but I can definitely recognize them as the classics that they are. Growing up as a Nintendo girl, I respect the influence the games have had on the gaming community and culture as a whole.

My fondest memories of these games, aside from their influence, is actually playing with my sisters. Being player two to my older sister and then player one to Rachel was always a good time, even if the games themselves were never beaten.

Have you played Super Mario All-Stars, or the individual games in the compilation? What did you think of them?

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Flashback Friday: Wii Fit

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone, the last of 2018!

With the end of the year comes time for new year’s resolutions! One of the most common resolution for people is getting fit, getting healthier, all that fun stuff, myself included. With that said, this month’s flashback is dedicated to Wii Fit.

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The Wii Fit came out a little over ten years ago, back in May 2008 for North America, a month after Europe, while Japan had gotten the game in December 2007 (perhaps also in time for new year’s resolutions?). Reviews were generally positive, with the biggest criticism for the game being how some of the workouts were lacking in intensity.

Wii Fit included a balance board to help measure a player’s progress in the cardio, strength training, and yoga activities while keeping track of the player’s weight, height, and center of balance. Wii Fit has been praised for its use in nursing homes, for physical rehabilitation, and health clubs around the world, particularly for its help in improving posture and movement in the elderly.

I remember Rachel and I having fun with the Wii Fit. Rachel’s Mii avatar was so skinny due to her being rather small, and the Wii Fit had a difficult time trying to figure out a fitness plan since burning calories wasn’t exactly something she needed to do. On the flip side, one of our younger cousins cheated at the game. During one of the jogging levels, instead of keeping the wii-mote in her hand and pumping it as she jogged in place, she sat down on the couch and shook it. The Wii Fit was very proud of her jogging score!

Still, it was a fun way to get us all moving and seeing the Miis in all the random activities was amusing. We still have our Wii Fit board chilling in our den. I’m definitely interested in the Fitness Boxing game for the Switch, which seems to be a spiritual successor to the Wii Fit game with an emphasis on boxing!

Have you played Wii Fit? What did you think of it?

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Flashback Friday: The Legend of Zelda Minish Cap

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

One of the last posts for Zelda Month, this Friday we’re talking about a game that came out for the GameBoy Advance. The Legend of Zelda: Minish Cap was a charming installment for the franchise.

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The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap was a game released for the GameBoy Advance back in 2005 for North America. Rather than traveling through time, morphing into a wolf, or sailing the seas, Link has a sarcastic hat that helps him shrink in size. It was a prequel, if you will, to Four Swords Adventures, wherein the main villain was Vaati the Wind Sorcerer. The Minish Cap helped to expand the backstory of that particular villain and the birth of the Four Sword.

The Minish — or Picori — are a race of bug-sized creatures that live in and around Hyrule. They are the ones who bestow green clothes and a sword to a boy to drive back the darkness. Vaati petrifies Zelda, and Link uses the aid of the Minish to collect the ancient artifacts to restore the Picori blade to its former glory to seal Vaati away.

I’ve played through this game back when it first came out and I found it enjoyable. The graphics were vivid and colorful, and the characters were amusing. Ezlo, the talking hat, was like a squawking, sarcastic bird, and poor Link just went along with it. The dungeons were fun and I don’t recall anything too frustrating. However, I never finished the game due to rage-quitting at the final boss.

The final boss battle is timed, and not by a ticking clock, but by the sound of bells. Vaati’s wizard-like form (not to be confused with his flying eyeball form in Four Swords Adventures) has three phases, and if you spend too much time beating him down, the final bell will chime and Zelda will be encased in stone forever.

Which is definitely what happened when I played the game.

Still, I remember the game being a fun time and it’s a game that I almost forgot existed until recently when Rachel and I started playing Four Swords Adventure on our Twitch channel. Perhaps one day I’ll return to it.

Have you played The Minish Cap? What did you think of it?

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Flashback Friday: Dogz II

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday, everyone!

If there’s anything else I’m passionate about beside video games, it’s animals. One of my earliest video game memories involves a certain computer game about virtual dogs.

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Dogz II was one of the very few — if there were any others — game programs on the solitary computer in my grandparents’ house when I was a kid. When I wasn’t trying my hand at the SNES (or bothering my uncle to play said console), I was probably playing with the virtual dogs on the desktop.

Dogz II was one of the many installments of the Petz franchise developed and published by P.F. Magic back in the mid-nineties. Since then, sequels have been published, up until Dogz 5 and Catz 5. The games were virtual pets that you take care of from puppies and kittens to adults and, in the later installments of the series, you could breed and raise their offspring from newborns.

This particular installment was one of the simplest. You were able to adopt one of a handful of breeds, name them, and then care for them. Toys and food were available to let you interact with the pet, and your mouse icon turns into a hand to pet, snap to call over, and pick up your pet. Aside from the playpen mode, where your dogs are in the windowed mode of the game, you can also let them run around on your desktop.

Supposedly, you were supposed to let them loose on the desktop while you’re working, but I’d be hard-pressed to get any work done while watching my virtual dog chase my cursor, dig holes into my background, or carry around the icons. Of course, I’d never get mad at the dog — it was too cute!

Despite the Petz games being for Windows 95 or so, rather than Windows 7 or 10, I still have my CDs of Dogz II and Petz 5. For kicks, I tried to install Dogz II on my Windows 7 laptop, and guess what?

It works:

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Now I’m trying to decide if I want to dive down this rabbit hole and adopt a virtual pup or two to have running amok while I work…

Have you played any of the Petz games? What did you think of them?

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