The Lion’s Song [Game Review]

Game Review: The Lion's Song | Nintendo | Nintendo Switch | DoublexJump.com

Title: The Lion’s Song
Developer: Mi’pu’mi Games
Publisher: Mi’pu’mi Games
Platform: 
Nintendo Switch
Category: 
Adventure
Release Date: 
July 10, 2018
How we got the game: 
We bought and downloaded it onto our Nintendo Switch

krismii
I first heard about The Lion’s Song from a random article that detailed some good indie games that were coming to the Nintendo Switch. The premise and graphic style from the screenshots the article provided intrigued us enough to give it a try.

rachmii
It reminded me of a visual novel, even though that’s not the style of the game. However, each character is in the creative arts and shows their individual stories. That’s what enticed me to the game.

gameplay

krismii
The Lion’s Song is a point-and-click visual novel-like game. Each episode stars a different person practicing an art form, like composing music or painting. While trying to navigate their problems, you point and click on their surroundings, trying to help guide them in the right direction.

rachmii
The premise of each story is to help their muse along so they can get their work done. However, you’re also solving their real-life problems in the process as they try to focus on their work and also reality.

 krismii
While doing this, choices pop up from time to time. The outcome of the situation will depend on how you answer these choices. At the end of each episode, the game tells you whether or not the majority of other players picked the same choice as you, as well as giving you the opportunity to return to the point of the story of the choice to choose the other options if you’re curious as to the other outcomes. Going back and seeing how the other choices work out does not affect the current playthrough, which I thought was a nice touch.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
There’s not much else for you to do as the player other than try to make the right choices for your character. As long as you can move the analog stick and press the A button, you’re good to go. The gameplay is simple and you just need to follow the storyline for each character.

graphics-music

krismii
I was definitely interested in the art style of this game. It reminded me of a comic or a film noir, grainy with not too many colors. It wasn’t displeasing at all — I’m always up for trying games with unique art styles.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
At first glance, the art style can seem “boring” to some people, but it really adds a certain atmosphere to the game. The game can get intense at times and the art style really adds to that feeling.

krismii
Along with the art style, the music and sound effects really work with the game in ramping the tension and setting the atmosphere. For example, the first episode starred a young woman named Wilma trying to create a violin composition. She’s writing it in a cabin nestled in the mountains with a thunderstorm brewing overhead. The rain, the wind, the thunder, the scritch-scritch of her pen as she writes the melody… It all works together beautifully to set the tone.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Plus, as she has revelations with writing the composition, her violin will play in the background as though she’s hearing the music as she writes the notes. It’s cleverly done.
story

krismii
In the first episode of The Lion’s Song, we play as Wilma, a young musical prodigy struggling to compose a final piece for a concert. She fights through anxiety, unrequited love, and nightmares while trying to find the inspiration and her voice in a secluded mountain cabin for her piece. Your choices help decide if she can finish her melody on time for the concert.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
In Episode 2, you play as Franz, an artist. You aid him as he tries to paint people as real beings showing their true personalities. This one is tougher than the first episode. It’s not as linear and a lot of the choices are tougher.

krismii
Episode 3 starred a woman mathematic. Rachel and I both jokingly balked at doing a story about math, but it was probably one of our favorite episodes. Back in the time that the game is set — right on the cusp of World War 1 — it was unheard of for a woman to have a brain “logical” enough to grasp mathematics, let alone create and prove her own theories. Her story was about reaching out and finding help with her theories, but her gender prevented her from connecting with the like-minded male professors of math, causing her to cross-dress in order to join their circle. One of the main mechanics of this episode was flipping back and forth between her female and male personas in the pursuit of knowledge and smashing the sexist barriers found in that time.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Episode 4, the final episode, was short and sweet. It took us about an hour to get through and it was a neat wrap-up to the previous three episodes. You’re stationed in a train car talking to three other men and you get to play as those three briefly as they swap stories, all connecting back to the other three episodes. I don’t want to say too much due to spoilers, but it was very well done.

replay-value

krismii
Considering all the different choices you can click on throughout the episodes to show off different results and endings, The Lion’s Song has some decent replay value. Each episode has secrets about the characters, a story that you unravel with your choices, and it was always interesting to see how the episodes themselves connected with one another.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Once you finish an episode, stats appear showing how many other people chose the same choices you did. You can go back and change your decisions to see what else could happen. It’s a great game with wonderful storytelling.

The Lion’s Song gets…
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

Advertisements

The Witness [Game Review]

Game Review: The Witness | Video Games | Gaming | Video Game Review | Xbox One | Puzzle Games | DoublexJump.com

Title: The Witness
Developer: Thekla, Inc.
Publisher: Thekla, Inc.
Platform:
Xbox One (Playstation 4, PC, and Mac)
Category:
Puzzle & Trivia
Release Date:
January 26, 2016
How we got the game:
I downloaded it onto my Xbox One

 

 

 

The Witness is a game I had heard about through watching a streamer on Twitch. I was instantly drawn to the tranquility of the game and the beauty of the graphics. When I realized it was a puzzle game, I was all in and wanted to give it a try myself.

gameplay

The Witness is easy to play, but not easy to figure out. You play in first person mode moving around with the analog stick exploring an unfamiliar island. There are computer-like screens just about everywhere with puzzles on them.

Each puzzle is a line puzzle, for lack of a better way to describe them. You start at once end and make your way to the other. However, it’s not as simple as it sounds. Each puzzle has its own set of rules. For example, the tutorial puzzles are as easy as getting the line from one end of the other, but the next set of puzzles have black and white dots in the mix. To get the line from one end to the other on those puzzles, you need to take a roundabout way to group the black dots together and the white dots together, separating the colors.

That one is fairly easy to figure out the rules once you get the hang of it. There are no rules or no directions. This game has no dialogue or instruction of any kind. You need to figure out the puzzles, the “rules” of each puzzle on your own. You need to explore the island on your own and decide where to go next.

I’m pretty sure there is no linear path, but the puzzles do get more and more difficult as you progress.

graphics-music

Normally I’d say the puzzles are my favorite part of the game, but I think for this one it’s the graphics. The world The Witness has taken you is a beautiful one, even if it is unfamiliar and a bit scary to explore.

The colors are so bright and each biome (the forest, the desert, etc.) are spot on with their colors and the overall atmosphere. There are some interesting spots throughout the island which are meant to help you get your memories back. The island has a mysterious aura around it and it’s done well.

There’s not much music to this game. It’s soft and soothing that adds to the calmness of the island and aids you when you get frustrated with a puzzle here and there.
storyAt the beginning of the game, your character wakes up in a dark tunnel. You make your way out into the fresh air of the island with some tutorial puzzles. However, you have no idea who you are, where you are, or how you got there in the first place.

The story is a mystery and you need to explore the island and solve the puzzles to find clues about your past and the island itself.

replay-value

This definitely has some replayability since one could never remember the solutions to the puzzles. While they don’t change, some of the answers are so complex you can’t remember them and have to re-figure them out. There are well over 600 puzzles in this game, so you may even forget some of the rules to certain puzzles.

This is a one-player game, but I can see playing with a group, passing the controller along, trying to figure the puzzles out together or simply just taking turns to give your brain a rest.

The Witness gets…
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let me know in the comments below! 

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

Burnstar [Game Review]

Happy Sunday!

We’re over at Miketendo64 today with another Nintendo Switch game review of Burnstar.

Head on over and check it out!

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

Miles & Kilo (Game Review)

Happy Wednesday!

We’re over at Miketendo64 today with a new Nintendo Switch game review, Miles & Kilo. Check it out and we’ll be back tomorrow!

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

Drawful 2 [Game Review]

Surprise Sunday!

We don’t normally post on Sundays, but here’s a fun game review we did today over at Miketendo64. Be sure to check it out over there and let us know what you thought of the game if you’ve played it. 

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

The Legend Of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds [Game Review]

Game Review: A Link Between Worlds | The Legend of Zelda | Nintendo | Video Games | Gaming | DoublexJump.com

Title: The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds
Developer: Nintendo Entertainment Analysis & Development, Monolith Soft
Publisher: Nintendo
Platform:
Nintendo 3DS
Category:
Action, Adventure
Release Date:
November 22, 2013
How we got the game:
I bought it

 

 

 

I’ve seen just about every Legend of Zelda game played by Kris. I always watch her and I love the games, though I’ve never played one myself before. I’ve had this game for a while and I thought it’d be cool to finally play it. I was especially pleased to be halfway through the game and then this version was Zelda was announced for Super Smash Brothers Ultimate.

gameplay

The game play is pretty straight forward. Link can run, swing his sword, use his shield, use various items, and transform into the walls with the appropriate buttons.

For the first part of the game you go through three different dungeons in Hyrule to collect the Triforce pendants. They’re marked on the map respectively and you need to go back to your house to “rent” items such as the hammer, bow and arrows, bombs, and so on from Ravio. You can rent the items for a flat fee but if you game over, Ravio takes his items back and you need to pay him again the next time you play.

For the second part of the game, you need to save the Seven Sages in Lorule. The dungeons and enemies are harder in Lorule, but it’s still easy enough.

graphics-music

This is a 3DS game and I enjoy the graphics very much. The characters are almost chibi-like as they’re small on the screen yet 3D. I feel like Link bounces around the screen with his hat flapping in the air. Despite the plot of the game, the graphics have an overall good-feel to it. The colors are bright in Hyrule and dark in Lorule, but still pretty vivid. The whole thing is easy on the eyes and aesthetically pleasing.

The music, of course, is my favorite part. My favorite video game soundtracks to listen to are from The Legend of Zelda. The exploration music is epic, the battle music is tense, and the in-between music is soothing. They’re all tunes I often get stuck in my head.
storyLike every other Zelda game, you play as Link who has to save Hyrule from some sort of evil being. In this one, Link is a blacksmith’s apprentice who delivers a sword to a guard at Hyrule castle only to run into Yuga, the antagonist, who transforms a descendant of the Seven Sages into a painting. His goal is to capture Zelda and all the descendants of the Seven Sages to resurrect Ganon. It’s up to Link, as always, to save the day.

After Link’s first battle with Yuga, he transforms Link into a painting in the wall. Of course, a special pendant given to you by Zelda earlier allows you to transform in and out of the walls willingly. Due to that power, Link is able to shift between Hyrule and Lorule – a different dimension parallel to Hyrule – to rescue the Seven Sages descendants.

replay-value

This is a semi-linear, straight forward game. The outcome is always going to be the same no matter how many times you play it, but it’s a classic that’s always fun to go back to. I’m sure, someday, I’ll be trying to decide what to play and come across this game and pick it back up again.

The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds gets…
5 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

Fortnite Battle Royale [Game Review]

We’re over on Miketendo64 today with a game review of Fortnite for the Nintendo Switch!

You can check it out here.

Have you hopped on the Fortnite train yet? Let us know in the comments below!

Connect with us:
Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr