Civilization VI [Video Game Review]

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Title: Sid Meier’s Civilization VI
Developer: Firaxis Games
Publisher: 2K Games
Platform:
PC, iOS, Nintendo Switch
Category:
Turn-based strategy
Release Date:
October 2016 (PC), December 2017 (iOS), November 2018 (Nintendo Switch) 
How we got the game:
Bought it for the Nintendo Switch

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I’ll be honest, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect from this game. I heard it was a simulation game, perhaps something similar to SimCity and the like but with an empire angle instead, which is what caused me to pick it up. I’m brand new to the Civilization series and, so far, it’s been an interesting ride.

gameplayBeing a turn-based strategy game, Civilization VI gives the player the task of dominating the planet through military, technology, or culture might.

Each turn allows players to found cities under their chosen world leader. The player then cultivates and grows their empire with their citizens, making them into settlers to found new cites, scouts to explore the world, builders to craft different districts for the cities, warriors to defend the empire, and plenty more. Technology and culture trees allow your citizens to advance further in the periods of development as the world evolves around them.

The buttons aren’t too difficult to learn, but I did find myself accidentally ending my turn once in a while when I was first learning to play. During your turn, you choose everything, from what your city is currently developing to how far any citizens outside of the city are moving, from scouts to warriors. You can also communicate with the other world leaders and, depending on your friendship level, may be able to make deals or trades with them.

Or go to war. That’s a thing.

Mainly the buttons are the main A button or using the analog stick to move your citizens to where they need to go along the world map. Decisions on what your cities should develop tech- and culture-wise, as well as the number of turns they take, all need to be considered when plotting your path to world domination. It’s a lot of strategy and gives a great challenge.

graphics-music

I was impressed with the graphics of this game, both with the scenery and the models of the character avatars. It was a clean, crisp looking game, especially when one considers all of the different eras that a game goes through. The world map was beautiful, making it enjoyable for me to send out scouts — with their adorable dogs — to all corners of the world to see what they had in store.

The music itself wasn’t as memorable, however. Rather, it was soft, no doubt allowing players to concentrate on making the best decisions they could for their citizens during their turn. The music and sound effects were subtle, which was appreciated. The voice acting for the avatars weren’t too bad at all, though. I was impressed at the voice acting for the most part.

storyThere does not seem to be one specific story line that this game follows. Rather, there are over a dozen historical world leaders that you can use as your avatar for your play through. With your leader, your task is to dominate the world throughout several eras of development while competing against other human or computer controlled leaders.

The story goes depending on how well you play. Want to go through the story and win with the mightiest army? You can do that. How about being the pinnacle of technology or culture? Sure. Navigating through the world and determining how you want to win depends on your actions as well as your reactions to the other players. Rival leaders may have special conditions and their A.I. may reflect some behavior that their real counterparts may have exhibited while ruling.

replay-value

Replayability is this game’s middle name. With several leaders to choose from as well as multiple ways to run your empire and interesting AI players, no two playthroughs will ever be virtually alike. One playthrough can be a bit long, however, considering how many turns are in a game, so be mindful of the clock when playing. Time can pass by very quickly with this game!

Civilization VI gets…
4-lives
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! If you like this post, please share it around!

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Rachel’s Favorite Games Played In 2018

Rachel's Favorite Games Played in 2018 | Video Games | Gaming | New Year | DoublexJump.com

10. Lovers in a Dangerous Spacetime

This was a game for the Xbox One that Kris and I played with two of our friends. We didn’t get the chance to beat the game, but it was a 4-player co-op game and it was a lot of fun to play with others. It was stressful but we had a good time.

9. A Case of Distrust

This is a visual novel-like game. It’s a mystery with satisfying music and cool visuals. This is a short game and it was slow to get into the story, but it was a good game nonetheless.

8. Miles & Kilo

I had a lot of fun playing this game. Miles & Kilo are trying to fix their ship. Kilo, the dog, automatically runs at top speed and you have to jump a precise moments. It’s a fun, satisfying game and harder than it seems.

7. Overcooked 2

This is another game Kris and I love to play with our friends. We love the first game and a lot new mechanics were added to the second game. This game is so frustrating and stressful, but it’s a good one.

6. The Lion’s Song

A point-and-click sort of game, The Lion’s Song tells a wonderful story through the eyes of four different characters. Each character is a creative – an artist, musician, mathematician, and a writer. Each of their stories are told within the same world and they all intertwine. It’s a great story-telling game and I hope there’s more some day.

5. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures

Kris and I streamed this Gamecube game on our Twitch channel. It’s a game we played a long time ago and it was awesome to get the chance to play it again. It’s no secret we love The Legend of Zelda so having a co-op Zelda game is great.

4. Luigi’s Mansion

This is one of my favorite games. I was able to get the Gamecube going and play the game again but also having the ability to play it on the 3DS was a treat. I enjoyed the updated graphics and just getting the chance to play the game again regardless of whether I was able to get the Gamecube to work or not.

3. Detective Pikachu

This is a game that I had been looking forward to for a long time. I was so excited to finally get the chance to play the game when it came out. I don’t normally pre-order games for myself, but I did with this one. It was a nice change of pace from the typical Pokemon games. I love Pokemon and mysteries, so it was so much fun to experience this one.

2. Super Smash Brothers Ultimate

I mean, I don’t know if I need to explain this one. This is another game that I have been eagerly awaiting for a so long. There were some things, such as the Spirit mode, that I was iffy about, but now that I’ve played the game, I’ve fallen in love with every bit of it.

1. Let’s Go Eevee!

Let’s Go Pikachu goes along with this one, but I technically haven’t played the Pikachu version yet. I’m so happy to have the chance to visit the Kanto region once again. I love having my Pokemon follow me around and I can ride and interact with them. It’s awesome to see Kanto in a new light and I can’t wait to complete my Pokedex and go shiny hunting!

What are some of your favorite games that you’ve played in 2018? Have you played any of the games I listed? Let me know in the comments below!

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Deltarune Chapter One [Review]

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Title: Deltarune Chapter One
Developer: Toby Fox
Publisher: Toby Fox
Platform:
PC
Category:
Role-Playing
Release Date:
October 31, 2018
How we got the game:
Downloaded for free for Windows

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Deltarune is a spin-off of Toby Fox’s original, critically acclaimed game Undertale. Chapter One is the demo of Deltarune that Fox released on Halloween this year — a rather fitting day — to see how well it’d be received. Judging by the reactions I’ve seen and my personal opinion of it, I think many gamers enjoyed it. Be aware that, considering this is only chapter one, a demo of sorts, this review will probably contain some spoilers.

gameplay

Deltarune plays similarly to Undertale. Using a top-down perspective, Deltarune employs role-playing tactics in an 8-bit like world. Battles give you different options, such as ACT or SPARE. Players use these actions to either avoid fighting the monsters they encounter or by attacking them to move on. While the goal is to avoid fighting, allowing the monsters to live, the player (and one of their allies) can attack instead.

Unlike Undertale, Deltarune uses a multi-member party. Your character, Kris, is the human leader while Susie is a monster who rather likes using force. Ralsei is the third member and is essentially the healer of the party who is in favor of sparing every monster the group encounters. Kris has the ability to influence the others actions on their quest, although at the beginning Susie is not controllable by the player, so sparing the monsters can be a little difficult. The party also has Team Points, which allows them to perform stronger magic spells or attacks, if need be.

Another difference from Undertale is that Deltarune Chapter One only has one ending. While the choices the player made in Undertale reflected what kind of ending one would get, Deltarune’s choices didn’t matter much. At the beginning of the game, some NPCs actually tell Kris that their choices don’t matter.

The gameplay for Deltarune took the mechanics from Undertale and improved upon them. I much prefer Deltarune’s combat system to Undertale’s, but the charm from the first game was still very much present in Deltarune.

graphics-music

Deltarune’s graphics are the same 8-bit graphics that Undertale used, keeping the style the same to further connect the two games. It’s not revolutionary, but the imagination that was poured into many of the monsters’ designs and profiles is wonderful. Seeing the quirky world that Fox has created and being immersed in it is a treat.

The music is gorgeous as well, pieces that Fox has composed and being familiar enough to remind us of Undertale but also standing out on their own. I cannot wait for a full soundtrack.

storyDeltarune opens with Kris, a human living in a world where Monsters roam on Earth, being taken to school by their adoptive mother Toriel, a maternal goat-like creature. Once Kris gets to school, they’re tasked with Susie, the bully of the class, to get more chalk from the supply closet, which turns out to be a portal to the Dark World.

In the Dark World, Kris and Susie meet Ralsei, the Prince of Darkness, who is incredibly sweet and fluffy. Ralsei is convinced that he, Susie, and Kris are the three heroes destined to save the world. Susie… is not as convinced. In fact, she decides to find her own way out of the Dark World, not wishing to play the role of hero.

Lancer is the fourth most important character, who is actually the prince of the cruel King who has seized control of the Dark World and wishes to continue spreading darkness. He is trying to stop the heroes and, for a while, has Susie on his side. During these times (and through amazing dialogue), all four kids end up becoming allies and friends.

Although Lancer at one point traps Kris, Susie, and Ralsei in prison, it was really due to him wishing for them not to encounter the King. Lancer was afraid that either his new friends or the King would get hurt. When the trio do encounter the King, they are able to exhaust him enough to win the battle. The trio’s actions — whether or not they have killed anyone in their path to escape the Dark World — will determine the outcome as to how the King is dispatched. Either way, Susie and Kris will return to their world.

The player is then allowed to explore the town, finding the Undertale Easter eggs scattered throughout, before returning home and going to bed. After the credits roll, Kris stirs from bed in the middle of the night, rips out their soul, and locks it into a birdcage. Kris pulls out a dagger and, with glowing red eyes and a sharp grin, looks back at the screen at the player, a cliffhanger for Chapter Two.

replay-value

Being a demo and just the first part of what will hopefully be a bigger, finished game, Deltarune Chapter One is great fun with wonderful characters and fantastic writing. With that said, there’s not too many secrets or Easter eggs to find after playing through it the first time, especially since there is only one ending. Still, with how much fun it is, I can see myself going back to Deltarune once in a while.

At least until the full game comes out.

Deltarune gets…
4-lives
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

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Rushin’ Through

Rushing Through Games | Game Reviews | Video Games | Gaming | DoublexJump.com

krismii
We play a lot of video games for this blog, and we like playing a lot of video games. Otherwise, this blog wouldn’t exist. However, there are definitely times when we feel that we rush through games more than take our time and just enjoy the games for what they are.

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Writing game reviews is fun and I love being able to contribute to gamers and devs alike. I enjoy sharing and promoting games we liked and even games we didn’t care for too much. However, playing video games take time and it can be tricky to get their reviews out in a timely manner.

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It’s a downside to doing reviews, I suppose. Obviously, we want the reviews to be timely and relevant, especially with how quickly games come onto the market. It’s a stark difference from when we were kids and could only afford games a couple of times a year. We’d take our time with those games, exploring every world and level, then replay them and old favorites while waiting for new games for Christmas and our birthdays. Now we pre-order games that are coming out months later to take advantage of Amazon Prime savings.

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We’ve noticed lately that we constantly have a backlog of games. There are so many old ones we own that we still have yet to play and then there are the new games that were just released or will be soon that are currently in the news that all gamers are playing right now. We’ve tried to get on a “gaming” schedule before but with real life and Kris’s day job, it’s tough to stick to one.

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Even if a gaming schedule worked, it would also mean trying to shoehorn in gaming during times that we may not feel like it. We wouldn’t really enjoy the games if we felt like we were being forced to play them on a set schedule. I mean, if gaming wasn’t such an expensive hobby, the logical solution would be to quit my day job for more gaming time, haha!

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It would totally be nice to have the ability to play video games all the time again. What got us thinking about this was Octopath Traveler. It’s been such a long time since we’ve gotten excited about a lengthy game. Breath of the Wild was exciting for us and we released a “review” long after everyone else had because we were simply taking our time with it. It’s great to dive into another long story with in-depth storytelling and plot.

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While we’re not planning on taking as long with Octopath as we did with Breath of the Wild, we are definitely trying to savor it. The Nintendo Switch has been fantastic for indie games, especially smaller puzzle ones, but a nice story-driven RPG is perfect for us at this time. We’re curious as to what other people do when they find themselves with a backlog of games they want to play.

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Gaming is not meant to be stressful and we’re enjoying every minute of it. Which is why we’re excited to play more of Octopath Traveler and to seek out even more games we haven’t played yet.

Do you prefer to take your time with games and complete? Or play just enough to get a feel of it for a review? Let us know in the comments below!

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Sims 4 Seasons Expansion Review

Double Jump Kris MiiHello, everyone!

The Sims franchise is a favorite of mine ever since a coworker back from college let me borrow her collection of Sims 2 expansion packs. Sims 2 turned into Sims 3, which I still have installed, before Sims 4 came around. Sims 4 is how I find myself wasting and enjoying time nowadays, especially with the newest expansion pack, Seasons.

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The Sims 4 Seasons expansion pack came out a couple of weeks ago on June 22. Being a Sims expansion pack, I bought it for myself just in time for Camp NaNoWriMo, a monthly writing challenge, and I’ve been playing it as a reward for whenever I reach my word count goal for the day.

The Pets expansion packs always tend to be my favorites, because who doesn’t love virtual dogs and cats? Aside from that, though, Seasons is right up there as it gives so much more variety to the world that you’re playing in. The temperature changes, holidays, the new clothes and accessories for the sims, Seasons was always a coveted expansion pack for the Sims.

The Sims 4 Seasons comes with all of those. The temperature changes bring about new deaths and interactions for the sims, depending on how hot or cold the weather is. A thermostat is a new item for homes and businesses, allowing sims to make the temperature inside the house comfortable… supposedly. I still had my sims automatically dress up in their outdoor winter gear around the house in the colder weather despite the thermostat being set to warm (not to mention a fireplace or two in the house).

Holidays were interesting, especially since you can create your own. A calendar button is included in the interface, allowing the player to see the coming seasons and holidays in the next couple of weeks. Each holiday has “traditions” that you can assign it, actions that your sims can take in order to really celebrate the holiday. For example, Lovefest is the Valentine’s Day equivalent, and traditions can include gifting flowers to someone or going on a date, while Harvestfest’s main tradition is eating a Grand Meal. A sim’s personality traits also effect how they feel about the individual traditions. A romantic sim loves the idea of going on a date during Lovefest, while a loner sim ignores the same tradition. It’s pretty interesting to play around with, creating your own holidays as well as being able to plan events like birthday parties in advance.

The biggest addition to Sims 4 Seasons is the Gardening career. The gardening skill got an overhaul, making plants seasonal, while also adding the Flower Arrangement skill. With the Gardening career, you can either become a botanist or florist. Botanist focuses more on research and the gardening skill, while florist utilizes the flower arrangement skill as well. Gardening is the type of career that allows you to work from home if you wish like the careers from City Living, or you can create your own retail store for your floral arrangements if you have Get to Work.

One of the disappointing aspects of the expansion pack, in my opinion, is that there was no beach world or beach area to allow the sims to swim in the ocean or just hang out, really. Imagine being able to have a 4th of July-based holiday on the beach or just a beach party to go with Seasons. In Sims 3, with its open world, being able to swim in the ocean was a major development, and I feel that Sims 4 is missing out on this.

Still, there are plenty of extra activities, such as rollerskating, ice skating, beekeeping, having snowball and water balloon fights, along with the new holidays and Gardening career to keep you entertained should you choose to purchase the expansion pack. If you’re a big fan of the Sims and have the cash to spare, Seasons is a pretty good expansion to add to your game.

Do you play the Sims 4? Have you gotten the Seasons expansion pack? What do you think of it?

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Game Dev Tycoon [Game Review]

Game Review: Game Dev Tycoon | PC Games | Video Games | Gaming | Steam | DoublexJump.com

Title: Game Dev Tycoon
Developer: Greenheart Games
Publisher: Greenheart Games, Headup Games
Platform:
PC, Mac, Android, IOS
Category:
Economic Simulation
Release Date:
December 10, 2012
How we got the game:
We bought it on Steam

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Game Dev Tycoon is a fun, addicting simulation in which you try to become the best game developer you can be within 35 game years. We first heard of the game from one of our favorite YouTubers, ProJared, and we became obsessed.

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We both have a love of simulation, casual games, though it’s not often we come across a really good one like this one.

gameplay

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Game Dev Tycoon is played by clicking and selecting options from menus. For example, clicking on the screen will bring up options to create a new game, find contract work, find a publishing deal, or look at your game history. It’s very simple in terms of controls and the premise, but every action you make will affect your company, either for better or for worse.

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Every action affects your company, yeah, but a lot is luck. You might think you’re making a great decision and it completely backfires. You start off by yourself in your garage making small games here and there. Once you get enough money, you get your own office. Now you can hire two employees and create games faster.

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Eventually, you can get an even bigger office and hire a full team of six employees aside from yourself. Your employees affect your games as well, depending on their strengths in the design or technology department, as well as their speed and efficiency at research. You can train them to raise their stats, but it will cost money and research points, not to mention their monthly salaries and the rent for your office. With more employees, you can create even bigger games, which may bring in more fans and sales. Researching new topics and assets to your custom game engines — such as dialogue trees, soundtracks, open worlds, mini-games, just to name a small few — will also help drive up those game sales. As long as, you know, the critics like the games.

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You have to manage your time well too because the time in-game moves pretty quickly. You need to sort out who’s going to research what, train their skills and when. Don’t forget to train yourself as well… something I often forgot. I usually did all this in between games too because it’s much better to have everyone working on the game at once. You can assign what aspects of the game you want your employees to work on. Everyone has a meter that fills up a percentage of how much they’re working. Ideally, you want your employees and yourself to be under 100% so they don’t overwork themselves. They do have a tired meter as well. If that goes down their work will slow or stop altogether. You can simply click on them and send them on vacation for a bit.

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There are events happening all the time that can affect your work as well, such as big name video game companies coming out with new consoles, events that have to do with your fans, or market analysis news that tell you what kind of genre or target audience is popular at the moment. There is also “G3,” the game’s equivalent of E3, every year that you can attend. Depending on the size of the booth you can afford, you may get more fans and hype for the next game you’re making. The more hype for a game, the more sales you may generate. Beware, too much hype for a game that ends up being less than stellar may result in you losing fans.

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After 35 years in-game, the game “ends.” You get a list of your stats such as your best selling game, least sold game, most used topic and genre, and more. All of that adds up and you get a score. The points don’t really matter but it’s fun to check out anyway. After that you can either keep playing the game without any “story elements” or you can start a new game and try to beat your score.

graphics-music

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Game Dev Tycoon, being a casual simulator, doesn’t have a huge world or multiple levels to explore. Instead, you have the background of your office, your avatar and employees glued to their computer screens, and statistics and news bubbles around the edges of the game window. The graphics are very clean while being sure that you’re mentally focused on your budding game development company.

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It’s simple and it works. You’re so focused on pointing, clicking, and checking the stats in the top right corner that you barely notice anything else going on – which isn’t much. The colors are bright and fun and the backgrounds for each office are cool to look closely at as your employees get their work done.

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To go along with the chill graphics, the music is relaxing as well. It’s minimal, allowing you to zone into the work you have to do to develop the best games possible. There aren’t too many sound effects, either, but the best one is these little “bubbles” of productivity from your employees. While working on a game, the game earns bubbles of design and technology, depending on the speed and the workers’ strength in those areas, and it is extremely satisfying to see all the little bubbles go flying!

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The music is smooth and relaxing, definitely. Even clicking on options for what to do next is a satisfying sound. The bubbles though were definitely my favorite! Their popping sounds were satisfying to listen to and yeah, to watch them fly across the screen was mesmerizing.
story

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Game Dev Tycoon starts off with your avatar sitting in a little garage-turned-office with a handful of money and big dreams to become a famous — or at least profitable — game developer. With only the ability to make small games with a few randomized topic options, you have to do your best to balance out design and technology to make the best games as possible so you can move up in the video game world.

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The point is to move up in the gaming world and become the best video game company ever. That’s all there is to it. The points and money only add up to give you stats and points at the end for a high score. While you can keep playing the game after it “ends” in 35 in-game years, there’s still a way to lose. Sometimes the market doesn’t go your way and you can go bankrupt. So be careful your business doesn’t go up in flames!

replay-value

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With the random events and beginning topics, Game Dev Tycoon has some great replay ability. The luck of the draw definitely keeps the game interesting, and with its addictive gameplay, you’re always trying to improve your games and overall high score. Year 35 is a good time for the game to “end,” for at that point we found ourselves to be so successful with fans and profits, that the quality of our games didn’t matter as much when it came to sales. At that point, I was ready to jump right into a new game and just keep going!

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The game topics such as virtual pet, mystery games, and more are random when you first start. So there’s never a playthrough that’ll be the same. This is definitely something I’ll play again soon.

Game Dev Tycoon gets…
5 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

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[Review] Harvest Moon: Light of Hope

Double Jump | Video Games | Nintendo Switch | Harvest Moon | Light of Hope | Review | Game Review

Title: Harvest Moon: Light of Hope
Developer: Natsume
Publisher: Natsume
Platform:
PC, Nintendo Switch, Playstation 4
Category:
Role-Playing, Simulation
Release Date:
May 29, 2018 for Switch/Playstation 4 in NA; November 14, 2017 for PC
How we got the game:
Bought it for the Switch

krismii
Harvest Moon has been one of my favorite franchises since I was introduced to Friends of Mineral Town for the GameBoy Advance way back when I was in… I dunno, the beginning of high school? It was a long time ago, let’s just say that. I feel as if the older titles in the franchise better capture what Harvest Moon is supposed to be about, and I think that Light of Hope recaptured that.

gameplay

Harvest Moon: Light of Hope operates in a similar way to the majority of the other games in the franchise. As one of the main objectives of the game, you spend much of your time cultivating a farm, growing crops and raising livestock. Fishing and mining are also two activities that you do in order to help improve both your farm and the island itself.

The controls for Light of Hope are, actually, fairly simple. With the Switch controls set up the way I had them, usually in the Switch’s handheld mode, you move your character with the left analog stick and the A button on the right Joy-Con was your main action button.

A cursor — usually a little leaf or a green square if you were by a farming spot — showed you where you could make an action. The green leaf was used basically to indicate who you could talk to, while a green square would indicate what tool you could use. There is no switching tools around in this game. Instead, the game is smart enough to know what tool you need based on what you were facing. If there’s a tree in front of you, you’ll automatically use the ax to cut it down. You’ll swing your hammer if you meet a stone. And if you were facing a spot where you can grow a crop? Just stand there and hit A as your character automatically tills the spot, plants your preferred crop, water the spot, and toss on some fertilizer.

Of course, sometimes this hiccuped a little (yes, I know I patted and brushed my cow already, can you please just automatically milk it now?), such as if you suddenly moved your character and they’re tilling the next spot of grass instead of watering the potatoes, but it works well enough for me.

While you’re improving your farm and completing the story, you’ll also be making friends and wooing potential spouses, as you do in most Harvest Moon games. Talking and giving gifts to people improve your friendships, potentially unlocking further activities or pieces of the story. Many of the NPCs are in charge of shops on the island and you can sell products that you grow on the farm directly to them rather than stuffing them in the shipping bin. Some stores will pay you more for certain goods — such as the restaurant for fish or the flower shop for, well, flowers — than you would receive when shipping them.

All in all, the game play and controls are pretty smooth on the Nintendo Switch.

graphics-music

Light of Hope’s graphics were rather charming. Full-bodied sprites moved fluidly across the Nintendo Switch screen, and the animated expressions while characters were speaking to each other definitely amused me!

I almost always enjoy the music in Harvest Moon games, and Light of Hope was no exception. The seasonal music is always relaxing, especially in winter. Most of the tunes are updated versions of music from past Harvest Moon games, which just makes me enjoy them all the more.

storyThe protagonist of the game washes ashore a mostly-deserted Beacon Island in the middle of a storm. After being rescued by a couple of the last remaining inhabitants of the island, the protagonist decides to stick around and help draw back citizens to the island by farming and rebuilding the shops.

Beacon Island is home to a majestic lighthouse whose eternal light has vanished, the catalyst as to why many people abandoned the island. The protagonist vows to figure out why the lighthouse went out and to restore it once again.

The story reminds me of a cross between Animal Parade and Sunshine Islands. Restoring the lighthouse’s light comes down to finding the the lighthouse tablets. The game itself pretty much carries you through the story, so there is no literal searching for the tablets. NPCs will guide you through the chapters, giving you hints (or just outright telling you) what items you need in order to proceed. The story can take as little as 10 hours as long as you are able to find and/or save the necessary items you’ll need in order to find the stone tablets.

After the tablets are replaced in the lighthouse and the light is restored, the story ends. The protagonist is now able to continue raising their farm, expanding their house in case they want to marry an eligible candidate, as well as unlock special livestock and crop seeds.

The story itself isn’t much, but the many interactions between the player and the NPCs were cute. The only thing I found odd about the story was at certain parts where NPCs would “wait” in an area for the player to return with specific items to help move the story along, even if it took the player a couple of seasons to find the items.

replay-value

Most Harvest Moon games have plenty of replay value if one considers the different spouses one can woo and the multitude of ways one can arrange their farm. There are three save files per profile on the Switch, so if you’re the type to try to marry every potential spouse, go for it. Light of Hope also has multiple farms on the island as well, allowing you to experiment with different plants and crops.

It’s a charming, relaxing game that has plenty of potential for multiple play-throughs.

Harvest Moon: Light of Hope gets…
4-lives
4 out of 5 lives.

Have you played this game? What did you think? Let us know in the comments! 

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