Friday Favorites: Weapon Triangles

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday everyone!

A couple of Mondays ago, I wrote about the Rule of Three, a trope that exists in many stories, movies and video games alike. Many video games have aspects that come in threes that convey special attributes about the game, especially when it comes to combat. So today I’ll be sharing my favorite weapon triangles from various game franchises.

Double Jump | Video Games | Nintendo | Triangles | Rule of Three | Triforce | Legend of Zelda | Pokemon | Fire Emblem

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One of my first “weapon triangles,” this elemental concept was introduced to me through Pokemon Red and Blue. Bulbasaur’s Grass-type moves were strong against the Water-type Squirtle, whose own abilities were strong against Charmander’s fire attacks, which were strong against Bulbasaur.

Sword-Axe-Lance

One of the first parts of the prologues or introductions in a Fire Emblem game tends to be the weapons triangle. Namely, how the three basic weapons stack against each other in strength. Swords are quicker than axes, which are too close-combat orientated to be hurt by lances, which are long enough to stab before a sword. Or something like that. A few Fire Emblem games have another weapons triangle with the tomes. Dark magic is weak to light magic, which is weak to anima — or elemental — magic, which is weak to dark magic.

Power-Wisdom-Courage

Not a traditional rock-paper-scissors scenario, the Triforce from the Legend of Zelda franchise is a favorite “rule of three” for me. Almost every game in the franchise swirls around the relationship between Link, Zelda, and Ganondorf who hold Courage, Wisdom, and Power respectively. The relationship between these three fighting to protect and dominate the world has never failed to create an enjoyable story for me in these games.

What are your favorite weapon triangles in video games?

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The Adventures of Link and Larry

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Monday, everyone!

There was a recent article on My Nintendo News about a series of shorts on the Play Nintendo YouTube channel starring Breath of the Wild Link and a cucco named Larry. Being curious, Rachel and I sat down to watch the five episodes and, you will now be subjected to my thoughts on the episodes.

Double Jump | Video Games | Nintendo | Legend of Zelda | Breath of the Wild

Play Nintendo has a created playlist for The Adventures of Link and Larry on their YouTube channel. Play Nintendo is catered to younger gamers, even including a little blurb to parents about how age-appropriate the channel is in their “about” page. It’s a cute channel, but definitely not something older gamers will actively watch. Still, it does it’s job as an introduction to Nintendo, so to speak, for up and coming young gamers.

Watching the five “episodes” of The Adventures of Link and Larry will honestly only take about five minutes of your time. That is five minutes you’ll never get back. For the most part, it’s a narrator — who does a decent job of sounding enthusiastic, almost like a corny narrator from old 50s commercials, mind you — just detailing what Link and Larry the Cucco were doing in the little videos. Most of them really don’t have anything happening at all. The best of the five episodes was Larry Stuck in a Tree, complete with a ridiculous pun at the end of the minute-long video.

The idea of Link carrying around a cucco during his adventure is definitely intriguing to Rachel and me, as it is something that we probably would do as a challenge. The name Larry is also perfect for a cucco and we completely appreciate it. If these videos were longer with a little bit more semblance of a plot, however ridiculous it may be, we may have enjoyed these more.

Granted, I know that these episodes are on a YouTube channel geared towards much younger gamers with probably much shorter attention spans than me… but the idea is still there. I wonder how well your adventure would go if you carried a cucco everywhere?

Did you watch The Adventures of Link and Larry? What did you think? Would you be willing to carry a cucco on your journey?

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Of Art Books and Collections

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Monday!

Aside from collecting the actual games, Rachel and I enjoy collecting other aspects of our favorite games and franchises to celebrate them. Rachel, for instance, loves to collect Pokemon cards. For me, it’s all about the art books and posters of my favorite games.

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You know the saying, “Don’t judge a book by its cover?” No one listens to that when taken literally. Everyone judges books by their covers, as they are the first aspect of a book that will potentially snag a reader’s attention. It’s the same with video games.

Aside from box art — which, considering the digital age of gaming nowadays, may not exist — the art style and graphics of a game are one of the first impressions a game makes to a potential player. Screenshots and trailers are shared before the game is officially out to entice gamers, and I for one Google games before buying them to see if I can gauge how well I may like it, art style included.

Graphics are one of my favorite aspects to gush over when it comes to games and I am forever amazed at the designers and animators. So when Nintendo announces books dedicated to the art of some of their most popular games, I’m ready to say, “Take my money!”

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Take the Legend of Zelda series alone. We have the history collection — Hyrule Historia, Art & Artifacts, and Encyclopedia — along with the Creating a Champion coming out in November. There’s also The Art of Fire Emblem: Awakening, which looks gorgeous. Honestly, with the popularity of Octopath Traveler and its art style, I bet an art book for that game won’t be far behind. They have posters for all the main characters, which I would love to collect.

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I would love to collect these books and posters dedicated to the art of some of my favorite games and franchises. For now, though, Nintendo, space and money is a bit of an issue.

Do you enjoy collecting the art books or posters for video games? What are some of your favorites?

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Friday Favorites: Video Game Dads

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday!

Father’s Day is this weekend, so I thought I would use a post to celebrate some of the best video game dads. I hope everyone else is able to celebrate with their father or someone close to them this weekend!

Double Jump | Video Games | Nintendo | Father's Day | Dads | Dream Daddy | Legend of Zelda | Twilight Princess | Super Mario | Bowser

Rusl from Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess

Rusl is the father of Colin, the shy child who finds his courage throughout the game, from Twilight Princess. Rusl is the character from Link’s hometown, the swordsman, seemingly the guard of the village that most likely helped Link hone his own sword skills. Besides being a father figure to the hero of the game, Rusl is also a critical member of the resistance, saving Link during the attack on Hyrule Castle.

“Dad” from Dream Daddy

Dream Daddy is a visual novel where you play as a customizable dad and were able to romance several other (mostly) single dads. While your choices were crucial to the ending of the game, the player’s “Dad-sona” had an awesome relationship with his daughter Amanda. The interactions with her ranged from goofy and casual to affection and, well, fatherly. Their relationship is probably one of my favorite aspects about the game.

Bowser from the Super Mario series

Okay, we all remember that Switch Parental Control video, right? The adorable one when Bowser was the Most Responsible Parent of the Year because he was being sure his son Bowser Jr. was playing games that were appropriate for his age? Bowser is also a father figure to all of the Koopalings as well, allowing them to help him with his work and always very encouraging while doing so. Not only that, his motivation for kidnapping Peach in Super Mario Sunshine was literally just so Bowser Jr. could have a mom. Cool motive, still kidnapping, but the thought was sweet.

What are your favorite video game dads?

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Confession: I’ve Never Played Majora’s Mask

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Monday! How is everyone?

With E3 happening, many companies are showcasing new games and DLC and such for the world. Considering all the new games that are being shown off, I was going through some of our older games and came to a realization about one of my favorite franchises…

Double Jump | Legend of Zelda | Majora's Mask | Nintendo | Video Games | Gaming

I have a confession to make. I have never finished playing The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask.

The Legend of Zelda series has been one of my favorite franchises ever since I was able to pick up a controller. Even before then, Ocarina of Time was one of the titles that I constantly bothered my uncle to play so I could watch. The worlds, the swordplay, the tales of heroics about Link and Zelda… I love it.

Majora’s Mask, however, was never one of my favorites within the franchise. It’s arguably one of the most popular installments of the series, but I never found its appeal. In fact, it’s one of the only console Legend of Zelda games I haven’t completed (the other games being the Zelda titles that were on the NES, and my excuse is I didn’t exist back then). I know the story and the game play

I’m not entirely sure why I have no interest in Majora’s Mask. It has characters familiar from the Ocarina world with a sort of Wonderland feeling to them. It has a new world to explore, new items to discover in the form of masks, and an interesting story to boot — time travel with themes of death.

Perhaps it’s because I felt constrained by the time limit of three days. I felt as if my hard work from one set of three days was undone whenever I went back in time. The monkey I just saved from the Deku King in the woodlands? He’ll be sentenced to death for being wrongfully accused of kidnapping the Deku Princess, who is probably still trapped in the dungeon, when I play my ocarina. It brought about a repetitive mentality (“I already did this!”) instead of the liberated dungeon showing the positive influences on the world that Link is trying to save.

Maybe it was the collecting that came with the game. It had plenty of fun masks, all required to head off to the final boss of the game, but I was never a fan of collecting. Case in point was Super Mario Odyssey. It was a good game, but as soon as I was done with the main story, I haven’t turned it on again. I have absolutely no desire to run around and collect more moons, similar to how I never had the desire to collect masks.

Another reason could have been simply because Majora’s Mask just wasn’t my thing. An unpopular opinion? Probably. Maybe one day I’ll try to go back to it, but it probably won’t be anytime soon.

What do you think of Majora’s Mask? Do you have any popular games that you haven’t had the desire to play?

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Friday Favorites: Beaches in Games

Double Jump Kris MiiHappy Friday!

Being June, it’s supposed to be warmer, the perfect weather for a day at the beach. Considering where I am is kind of lackluster at the moment, with the weather ranging from the fifties to the eighties in Fahrenheit degrees rather than being consistent “summer” temperature, I’m going to visit some in-game beaches and pretend I’m there.

double jump | video games | nintendo | beaches | summer

 

Lurelin Village from Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Breath of the Wild boasts a gorgeous open world for you to explore while on your quest to save Hyrule from Calamity Ganon. One of my favorite places to go was Lurelin Village, a small town near the southern end of Hyrule with plenty of spots to watch the ocean water reflect the sunset. It also had a pretty decent shrine puzzle that was fun to figure out!

Harvest Moon Beaches

The Harvest Moon games that I’ve played tended to have nice beach areas. Back when More Friends of Mineral Town was the main installment I played, I always enjoyed the shift in the music and the ocean sound effects whenever I visited the beach. I’ve been playing Light of Hope on the Switch recently and I’m enjoying that beach area as well. It’s great to dig up shells for easy cash!

Seaside Town from Super Mario RPG

Not exactly a “beach,” per se, but Seaside Town was the place right next to the ocean, right before you dove underwater to confront a pirate on a sunken ship for a Star Piece. The town is first filled with impostors who spout out ridiculous lines and reveal themselves to be a challenging boss after you resurface from the pirate ship.  The music is also one of my favorite tunes from the game, too!

Slateport City from the Pokemon Gen. 3

The Hoenn region of the Pokemon games is one of my favorites generation-wise with the Pokemon and locations. The beach at Slateport City was great when I first encountered it, finding the soda pop shop a cute idea and enjoying the battles on the beach. Running around and leaving footprints in the sand always amused me as well.

What are your favorite beaches in video games?

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Friday Favorites: Fire Levels

Double Jump Kris MiiHey, it’s June!

A little while ago, I did a Friday Favorites dedicated to video game levels that reminded me of or were set in winter. To celebrate the coming warmer months, this time around my Friday Favorites post is dedicated to summery or hot levels.

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Cinnabar Island from Pokemon

In the Kanto region of Pokemon, the seventh gym badge is one you earn from the Fire-type gym on Cinnabar Island. The island is tiny, but I remember from the original Pokemon Yellow the red palette of the pixels, the abandoned mansion filled with lore and Fire-type Pokemon, the riddles from the gym… I can’t wait to see what it looks like in the Let’s Go titles!

Mt. Lavalava from Paper Mario

Let’s be real, the original Paper Mario for the Nintendo 64 was the best title in that series. Mt. Lavalava, the volcano dungeon that you explore after meeting all the Yoshis, was not only a fun area to traverse, but you also had Kolorado hanging out with you. Kolorado was an archaeologist only following you for treasure, but his hilarious dialogue and mannerisms make him one of my favorite NPCs to date.

Barrel Volcano from Super Mario RPG

My favorite aspect of Barrel Volcano is the music, if I’m being honest. Super Mario RPG had fantastic level designs to begin with, and Barrel Volcano is no exception. Challenging bosses — both mini and the main bosses — were found here along with an amusing shopkeeper doing business in the middle of the volcano. The Axem Rangers, spoofs of the Power Rangers, were also some of my favorite bosses in this game.

Dodongo’s Cavern from Ocarina of Time

Dodongo’s Cavern was probably one of my first “fire levels” in my gaming history. Ocarina of Time, being one of the first games that I’ve played on my own, was an amazing experience and I remember being in awe at the idea of exploring the cavern. That, and the bombs that you received around the same time was awesome!

What are your favorite fire-based or summer levels in video games?

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