DnD Adventure: Backstories

DnD Adventures: Backstories | Roleplaying | Tabletop Games | Gaming | DoublexJump.com

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When we first started up our original D&D campaign, the first full-fledged adventure after a two-session tutorial run, I recall our DM giving us players a moment saying, “Now’s the time when your characters should introduce themselves and tell a little bit about your backgrounds so I can use those details against you later.” Of course, the only one of us with a fairly detailed background was the cleric, as he had more D&D experience than the rest of us combined. Our bard had a couple of details, but only because this was her player’s second, perhaps, adventure rather than her first. Rachel’s and my characters, though, didn’t really have much of a background.

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For my first character, I filled out the basic stuff and the rest was unknown. The back of my character sheet was just about blank other than her height. I didn’t want to create an elaborate backstory and try to stick with it. I wanted to see how my character would react in certain situations throughout the campaign. However, with my second campaign character, I created a basic background per the DM’s request. And, honestly? I think I like it better than not having a background at all.

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I had a basic idea of my first character’s background, but it was mainly from the suggestions that the Player’s Handbook gave. If pressed, her basic motivation was to find more information on her parents, as she’s a half-elf and grew up in the wilderness. Other than that, though, her background was a blank slate as well. It’s pretty much on par for even the characters I create for novels. I let them run around and act out on their own, learning bits and pieces from them as I go about it. At this point, we’ve each created a couple of other characters for more campaigns and my characters’ backgrounds are more filled out. Our current DM’s homebrew world has plenty of backgrounds for us to adapt to, and we found that creating the backgrounds definitely helps to flesh out our characters more.

rachmii
Reese has a decent background. I not only used the background ideas from the Player’s Handbook, like you, but also our DM has created a semi-homebrew campaign. He had some background ideas fleshed out based on somethings in the handbook. Reese is from the Wetlands, and she follows the River Goddess. She’s very much into keeping the waters clean and she loves boats. She crafts boats and loves to go on water-based adventures.

krismii
I have a tiefling druid who is seeking knowledge about the world’s inner workings and is very exasperated with our current campaign since it is keeping her from reading, haha! Having more of a background for the characters also helps the DM since, if they know of the character’s background, they’re able to incorporate the characters more in the world the DM created. Entwining the characters’ goals based on what they’ve experienced in their history with the world is a common goal for every DM, I believe. Some DMs like to receive copies of the players’ characters beforehand to approve them, be sure their abilities and backgrounds would work with the world too. I think we have a happy medium with our current characters, having enough of an idea as to where the character comes from, but still figuring out their innermost traits by playing them.

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I agree, I think it helps all of us. Not just ourselves and the DM, but the other players as well. We have something to bounce off from. With that said, the next time you make a character, are you going to create a backstory or try to wing it again?

krismii
A mixture, I think. I want to give my characters enough of a backstory so I have some defining traits to roleplay them with. After all, backgrounds and history help to shape the characters. Yet, I don’t want to so rigorously define my character with a history that there’s little chance of further development.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
That’s fair and I can totally agree with that. I think, though, our DM opened my eyes to the backstories and the possibilities of how I can have fun with my character’s backstory. I might try to create backstories more often than not now.

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DnD Adventures: New Characters, New Adventure!

DnD Adventures: New Characters New Adventure | Dungeons and Dragons | Tabletop Games | Gaming | Role Playing Games | DoublexJump.com

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Now that we’ve finished our first starter campaign with our writer’s group, we’ve moved onto the next. Last month, we did an “episode zero.” We have a different DM who, ironically enough, also hosts our writer’s group. We spent a couple of hours creating our characters together before moving onto an introductory session. This time around, I’m a halfling cleric who goes by the name Reese Riverspoon. The first name came to me the moment I created the character while the surname took me a bit. She resides in the wetlands, her city floating on a river. She’s a carpenter who builds boats, so… I felt the pun was appropriate.

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This current campaign is a homebrew world courtesy of our DM, so we spent some time hearing bits and pieces of the world’s lore as well as how the races would react to one another. I decided to make a tiefling druid. I really enjoyed the ranger class and the connection it had with nature and animals, so I figured a druid would be different enough while also keeping some of those connections. My character is simply named Faith to go with the virtue names that the player’s handbook suggested for the race as well as the fact that she was found and raised by a gnome monk in one of the world’s temples. She’s on a journey to learn and understand more of the history of her temple when she gets caught up with the rest of the group.

rachmii
Yes, my character, Reese, worships the God of Nature and Great River. She was asked by the goddess herself to watch over the waters, keep them clean, safe, and the like. I’m eager for this story because with the starter campaign we were learning the ropes of DnD and didn’t have much of a character-plot connection. This time around, each character has a purpose and background that will affect where we go, who we talk to, all the whole moving along our individual subplots and the major plot.

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When we were finished creating our characters, our DM gave us a sort of pop quiz regarding any bonds our characters had with each other and our reason for being on a quest. He gave us each a question about our character’s pasts, asking what our purposes were for heading to the first city. Aside from that, we were also asked specific questions where we were to choose one of the other characters as the answer in order for us to already know one or two others in the group as opposed to all of us being strangers thrown together. Our answers ended up creating a chain of everyone knowing someone and we all ended up on Reese’s boat while heading toward the first city. It gave us some early role-playing ideas and purposes for our characters.

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I found that to be quite enlightening. Especially since I don’t typically come up with backstories right away because I’d like to get a feel for my character. However, being asked specific questions allowed me base my character on some things that are already known. Thus, we began with our motley crew arriving at the first city and already running into some mystery and trouble.

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It was great to already have a bit of a backstory drawn up for our characters to give them purposes and budding relationships. In this world, our characters arrived with some purposes like my Faith heading to the simposium to learn more about her temple’s history and Rachel’s Reese wishing to know more about the waterways and boats around the port city. Our characters wandered towards the theater district, got contracted to help clean out some vermin from an old theater so it can be renovated, then promptly got word that the person who contracted us to do so was planning on performing something dedicated to the dark god, who is basically called He-Who-Shall-Not-Be-Named like Voldemort.

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Being a halfling, Reese was able to sneak into the library after it closed while the guards spoke to the rest of the party about not being allowed in. She got some more information on the man who hired them through a chatty and gossip-loving librarian. When she left the library, they all went back to the shady Inn they’re staying at. Except they were met with a surprise instead.

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The inn itself wasn’t as shady as it was cheap. Like, we surprised the NPC that we chose to stay at that particular inn and he was so excited to have guests. It was a little strange, but we figured it wasn’t the strangest thing we’d see all day. On our way back to that inn after visiting the library, we were surprised with a mob rushing at us and… we left the session at that. Come next month, we’ll probably be rolling right into initiative! We’re definitely looking forward to seeing what comes next!

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D&D Adventures: Head-Eating Worms And Snarl

Dungeons & Dragons Adventures: Head Eating Worms and Snarl | Tabletop Games | Gaming | Roleplaying | DoublexJump.com

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Our November session of our D&D campaign continued our exploration of Cragmaw Castle. There was plenty of goblins to defeat and investigation rolls to mess up as we searched through the place for Gundrun Rockseeker, the dwarf that sent us on our original quest so long ago.

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Sapphire, my character, rolled pretty well when it came to finding hidden doors throughout the castle. I believe I ended up finding about three. As far as I know, we explored every inch of that place. Aside from exploring, getting a new companion, and one of our party members almost being eaten, we didn’t get much accomplished.

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I think we’re still in the middle of the castle, actually. Our dragonborn rogue almost got her head eaten by a creature called a Grick, a worm thing that kind of descended from the ceiling onto her as we explored old, decrepit hallways. Fortunately, she still has her head, and our explorations were occasionally rewarded with treasures and alcoves dedicated to statues of various gods. Our cleric wasn’t thrilled, since none of them were his god, but he’s usually a good sport about it all. Eventually, we came across a handful of enemies holding onto Gundrun. We slayed the enemies and, to the amused exasperation of our DM, tamed another wolf by the name of Snarl. My ranger now has both Ripper and Snarl accompanying the party because my ranger dislikes killing wolves. It is agreed that we add no more pets to the party.

rachmii
We probably are. Sapphire doesn’t pay attention to too much. Poor Sora, one of our party members, got their head almost eaten because whenever we have to enter a new room, they typically volunteer to go in first. In that sense, they kind of get the short end of the stick whenever there are enemies and they end up attacking us first. We all tried attacking it without hurting Sora in the process. I believe Sapphire ended up burning the Grick with cold fire magic.

krismii
I believe Sapphire, and then Ripper, were the MVPs of that particular fight. Sora is tough, though, and a little too headstrong for her own good, haha! Being the dragonborn, she has a decent amount of hit points to warrant her love of bashing through doors and hallways to get where we need to go. I believe we ended this particular session with us fighting off a horde of goblins in a tiny room. The room was tiny enough that I just had Ripper and Snarl wait in the next room but without the wolves, the fight was slow because we all somehow kept missing our targets!

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Oh, yes. I remember the tiny room. This was another point in our adventure where our DM could do nothing but facepalm at our decisions. That was another interesting battling since none of us could really move anywhere. That was what ended our last session though. So, we still have some exploring to do the next time we meet.

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D&D Adventures: Dragon!

Dungeons & Dragons Adventures: Dragon | Tabletop Games | Gaming | Role-Playing Games | DoublexJump.com

krismii
We’re a bit behind with our D&D Adventures series. This is about our October session when we went back to the main storyline after having our previous grinding session. We were in a town that our cleric seemed to recognize. Rather, he recognized that it may share his religion, so we went forth to see if there was anyone he knew. Instead, we found plenty of giant spiders, which we were not happy about, before continuing on to the Dragon Tower.

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We entered the tower and explored it for quite a bit. We entered a lot of rooms, killed a lot of things, and gained experience points. However, our main goal was to get rid of the dragon, Venomfang, and make him leave and stop terrorizing the town.

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When we first heard of Venomfang, the young dragon, terrorizing the town, my first reaction was, “Can we adopt him?” Our DM said no, unfortunately, haha! With that said, we eventually climbed through the tower and, at first, attempted to convince Venomfang to go and find another tower to haunt. He didn’t take the suggestion too kindly at first.

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We ended up battling. However, one of our companions is Dragonborn and didn’t want to battle the dragon. They tried to convince Venomfang to leave and that we didn’t want to hurt him. While the rest of us took a swing at him (or tried to, depending on our dice rolls), we mostly stopped and ended up taking turns trying to convince the dragon to leave… thus, confusing it. This also made me remember that my own character has dragon ancestry so our friend wasn’t the only one who could speak the dragon language – I could too. 

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My personal character’s charisma is dismal, so I focused more on getting a hit off here and there, as well as using her Ensnaring Strike to keep Venomfang stuck in place while the others convinced him to leave. I believe a handful of our party members rolled high enough in intimidation and persuasion to make Venomfang say, “I’m out!” and fly out of the tower.

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Yes, we eventually confused the poor sap enough for him to finally give up and leave. Our DM was exasperated with us because we tend to pity the creatures we have to fight. Apparently, we were never going to kill the dragon. Once it got down to a certain amount of hit points, it was going to retreat. This is part of the starter campaign, but our DM knows us all too well.

krismii
But, hey, the hits we did get off on the dragon were pretty good! Still, we were proud of ourselves for being successful in this part of the campaign. We all got to stretch some of our attacks and, at the time, newer spells, as well as practice diplomacy. We were about to leave the room when a handful of us rolled perception to see if anything else was around. The only one who rolled well enough to find anything was, actually, Ripper the wolf. Our DM mentioned how Ripper was, “looking intently up one of the walls,” so we called our Dragonborn rogue back into the room to scale the said wall. She chucked a treasure chest back down to the rest of us and we divided the loot.

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We’re not a very classy group (we’re pretty derpy) but we somehow get by. It’s always a lot of fun.

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Why I Chose To Play A Sorcerer In Dungeons & Dragons

Rachel Mii | DoubleJump.comHappy Thursday!

It’s no secret that Kris and I got into a Dungeons and Dragons group with some friends at the beginning of this year. We meet about once a month and are in the same group with the same campaign. That said, I chose to play as a sorcerer and have been since the beginning.

Why I Chose To Play As A Sorcerer In D&D | Dungeons and Dragons | Roleplaying | Gaming | DoublexJump.com

Narrowing Down The Classes

Looking at all the classes you can choose from when creating a character in D&D, I immediately was torn between the sorcerer, the warlock, and the wizard. While I would love to give all the other classes a try, there was no doubt in mind that I wanted to start with one of these three classes. This is for one reason: magic.

I’m not entirely sure why, but I’ve always gravitated toward magic users. Fire, in particular. Mutants in the X-Men world and other superheroes with fire powers were always some of my favorites. Fire-type Pokemon are my favorite. I have no idea where this love of fire came from, but I’m rolling with it anyway.

Playing Dungeons and Dragons is the closest I can get to becoming a superhero. If I can have magic – specifically fire – I’ll take what I can get.

But, how was I supposed to choose between these three classes for my first ever D&D campaign?

Where Does The Magic Come From?

The Wizard

I’m still trying to wrap my head around the D&D lore and their classes. However, from my understanding, Wizards learn their magic. They’re very much into knowledge and always learning new spells from other wizards or inscriptions they find throughout their adventures. They take their magic very seriously and actually care about their magic first above anything else.

I love magic, but I wasn’t sure if my character would really stay true to that. Regardless, my character is my character – they can be a rebel wizard. Still, I wasn’t sure if that was something I wanted to do.

Learning is great too. However, I wanted my character to have the magic inside of them. I didn’t want them to necessarily have to be “taught” new spells.

The Warlock

Warlocks basically make a deal with the devil to get their magic. They learn it, yes, but it becomes one within them. Warlocks are constantly wanting to know more about the worlds they live in. Through that, they make pacts with supernatural beings and gain magic powers. I wasn’t sure if I was quite up to the task of my character making deals with strangers to gain some magic.

Plus, despite this grand adventure, my character is an introvert and a hermit. So… there you go.

The Sorcerer

Sorcerers are born with the magic inside them. It comes from a specific bloodline they’re part of (my character is part dragon). Out of the three of them, I felt this was the most interesting. I thought I could do a lot with my character’s background and bloodline. Of course, I’m still exploring my character through the first campaign. We’re still getting to know each other.

However, I thought having the magic already inside her would open up a lot of future potentials when it comes to character development – especially since she’s part dragon and a hermit.

Sapphire The Sorcerer Was Born

Thus, Sapphire became a sorcerer. That’s it. I had no elaborate plans in mind. I just wanted magic and magic already being one within my character was the most appealing to me.

Although, I do hope I get the chance to try out every class type someday.

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