Game Dev Tycoon Challenge Complete

Challenge Complete: Game Dev Tycoon | Video Games | Gaming | PC Games | DoublexJump.com

krismii
At the beginning of March, we posed a challenge for ourselves and each other. Celebrating our love of the simulation genre, we wanted to dive back into Game Dev Tycoon, a game that puts you in the CEO seat of your very own game development company. We finally completed the challenge!

rachmii
After we both found the time to sit and play the game for a bit, we finally made it to the end. We played separately, each going through 35 years in the game with our respective gaming companies. We wanted to see which company was more successful. Can you guess who won?

krismii
I ended up winning, but I may have had a bit of an advantage. I’ve played Game Dev Tycoon a bit more often than Rachel has. I even have the mobile version to play on the go. We each did have the hints unlocked throughout this duration, allowing us that leg up from previous runs we’ve done instead of trying to figure out which aspect of a game was most important for which genre. I wonder how things would have changed had we kept the hints off?

rachmii
I would have been screwed if we kept the hints off. I had a terrible run this time around. I haven’t played the game as much as you, but I’ve done a few games on it. This was by far my worst time. I went bankrupt once (we set a rule in place that if we went bankrupt three times, we were out) and I spent about five years in-game being bailed out by the bank. By the time I made a decent amount of money, I’d have to repay the bank and then I’d be in the negatives again, having to be bailed out… rinse and repeat.

krismii
That always annoyed me with the bailout… I mean, it’s realistic, at the very least, but I feel as if you don’t make a couple of great games — scored 8 or higher — between the bailout and paying back the loan, then it’s just going to be a vicious cycle. I was lucky enough to not have any bailouts or bankruptcies. I had a fairly smooth game, although I did kind of rush at the end. In the last eight or so years, I was able to open up the two labs and I just made the last of my employees specialists before the 35 years was up.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I didn’t get any of that – no AAA games, no labs, never trained my employees high enough to become a specialist in something. Once I started making money, I rolled with it and continued making games and upgrading my game engines. In the end, I was doing really well. If we had gone longer than 35 years, I might have had a chance at beating you (or at least getting closer to your score).

krismii
I would have loved to keep going. Maybe if we ever do this in the future, we can opt to do the longer, 42-year run, haha! I didn’t get a chance to make a AAA game or MMORPG, which I would have loved to do. I was able to make a couple of consoles, which helped my score. In the end, I scored 53,188,028. My least profitable game was called Ripple Effect, a Superhero Action game, named after an old superhero novel series I’ve written. My most profitable game was Ace of Spades, the third in a series of Romance Adventure games, of all things.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Honestly, that makes sense for you. I feel like you tend to do well with the genres that you don’t particularly care for. I’m not sure why that is. A lot of my games were pulled out of my rear and I started stronger and totally lagged halfway through before ending on a strong. I still didn’t earn nearly as many points as you though. In the end, my score was 41,253,358. So, I was 11,934,670 points behind you. Good job. My least profitable game was Assassin Wanted. It was an assassin RPG-Adventure game that rated 4, 4, 3, 4, by the four reviewing companies. I have to say – I did awful, but out of this whole run, I never got a 1- or 2-score. My most profitable game was Spice It Up, a cooking casual-simulation game rating 10, 9, 10, 9. It was the sequel to a cooking casual game called Heat It Up which rated 8, 9, 8, 7. So, I improved, which was nice.

krismii
Thank you! Improving is always awesome! You did have one last game that you were just about to hit the finish button on right before the game ended. I wonder how your score would have been with that? I didn’t have any major failures, which was nice. I think my lower scores were in the 4 and 5 ranges. I did get one perfect 10 scored game earlier in the run for a Pirate Adventure called Treasure Cove. It ended up having three sequels, but I was never able to recreate the perfect score. That boost helped. This was a fun challenge, though! It was great to go back to Game Dev Tycoon, but I always wish there was more time for the story elements of it.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
This was a fun challenge. I think we should definitely have a rematch in the future. In the meantime, we need to figure out our next challenge!

Have you played Game Dev Tycoon? Let us know about them in the comments below! If you like this post, please share it around.

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Celebrating Simulation Games

Video Games | Gaming | Simulation Games | Genre | Doublexjump.com

krismii
It’s a new month in the year, and this March we’re thinking of celebrating one of our favorite genres of video games. Simulation games have become some of our most played games recently, with games like Stardew Valley and the Sims franchise. The new Animal Crossing game is coming out this month, Rune Factory 4 was just recently released, and there are plenty of dating sim games to explore.

rachmii
Simulation games are so much fun. Especially since you can have the kind of life you think you deserve. The possibilities are always endless in what you can do in a simulation game and you can spend hours and hours playing one specific game.

krismii
I enjoy trying to reach my own goals, be they specific to the game like a business management simulation or character-driven goals for your avatars in life simulation games. Simulation games have been getting a bit of a boost with virtual reality these past couple of years as well, such as games like Job Simulator and the Iron Man VR.

rachmii
Right, you feel like you’re accomplishing something even though, in real life, it’s not doing much for you. Still, they’re fun nonetheless and we’ve decided to talk about it all month including a new challenge.

krismii
The new challenge has to do with one of our favorite games, Game Dev Tycoon. As a refresher, Game Dev Tycoon puts you in the position of CEO of a budding video game company. Throughout the game’s years, consoles will come and go, gaming trends will happen, and you’ll do your best to make your company a success. I believe we’re mainly just going to see who can have the most money by the time the game’s years are up, right Rachel? Or is there any other criteria that you want us to judge?

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Yes, more Game Dev Tycoon! I believe we’re going to see which company comes out on top, yeah. I think the game runs for 35 years so by the end of that, whoever has the most money wins. I plan on keeping a list of my games so we can compare ridiculousness as well.

krismii
Keeping a list of games will be good too, yes! I know the game, at the end of the 35 years or so, gives you a list of stats of your company over the course of the game. We should try to screenshot and print those for the heck of it. Did we want to do the standard game length or adjust it for the shorter or longer game?

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Might as well do the standard game length. Go big or go home! In the meantime, while we build our virtual gaming companies, we’ll be playing and talking about some other simulation games, so stay tuned!

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Pokemon Trio-Type Challenge

Challenge Complete Pokemon Trio Type | Nintendo | Pokemon Challenge | Video Games | Gaming | Gaming Challenge | Video Game Challenge | DoublexJump.com

krismii
Last month, Rachel and I decided to put a new twist on our Pokemon games. Generally, both of us go on our journeys in the core series with well-rounded teams — Rachel usually has an idea as to which types and Pokemon she wants, while I just go and collect Pokemon of different types that I think are pretty cool. For this challenge, we were each randomly assigned a trio of types that we could use, as well as a random region to go through.

rachmii
Kris had to only have Pokemon that had the types Ground, Dark, and Dragon on her team. I was only allowed Normal, Electric, and Bug on my team. We also randomly generated which region we’d be in. Kris got a Hoenn Pokemon from the generator so she played Alpha Sapphire. I got a Unova Pokemon so I played White 2. It was… actually harder than we thought it would be.

krismii
While I’ve trained my fair share of Ground and Dark type Pokemon, Dragon was a type I wasn’t too experienced in and it was a bit difficult to find Pokemon that fit those three typings. I played by the rule that if at least one of a Pokemon’s types matched one of my three, then I could use it, such as Numel being Fire and Ground type. I also caught a Swablu due to its evolution being part Dragon. My Nincada, on the other hand, will never evolve as it’ll lose its Ground typing if it becomes a Ninjask.

rachmii
I played a little differently than Kris. I wanted all my Pokemon to exclusively be Bug, Electric, or Normal. So, my party consisted of Stoutland, Audino, Karrablast, Shelmet, Galvantula, and Tynamo. So I had at least two Normal, two Bug, and two Electric. I look at the game guide and made up my team before I started playing to make sure it was doable. The thing was, I went through the first five gyms with just Stoutland and Audino because the other four weren’t available to catch until later. At that point, the grinding to get the other four caught up in levels was a pain.

krismii
My way of playing was just to go through the adventure naturally and only catch those that had at least one of my typings (with the occasional Zigzagoon when I needed HM help). The first three gyms I only had Mightyena and Nincada, and I was able to catch Numel, Swablu, Cacnea, and Trapinch later. Grinding was definitely annoying, and I found myself with fainted Pokemon much more often in trainer battles than I ever have before due to the type weaknesses. You have to keep your team a little over leveled to account for their type weaknesses, which slows down the game play a bit.

Rachel Mii Double Jump
Yes, my Pokemon fainted a lot more than I usually let them too. As for HMs, I actually didn’t need to use any until after the fifth gym. It was surf – that Audino can learn – and strength – that Stoutland can learn. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to actually beat our games within our challenge timeline. I breezed right through the game up until right before the sixth gym where I needed to grind a lot. Though I plan on continuing to play this file and play at my own pace. I want this team to go through the Elite Four!

krismii
Oh, yes, I’m planning on continuing this file as well. We’re just about ready to face the fifth gym leader, so we’ll see how that goes! Aside from the grinding, it’s a fun challenge to try. Out of my team, Mightyena and Nincada are the only Pokemon I’ve trained before. The others are all brand-new to me, so giving them a chance in battle is definitely interesting. I wouldn’t mind trying a challenge like this again!

Rachel Mii Double Jump
I agree, this challenge has allowed me to branch out with new Pokemon. I rarely have Normal or Bug Pokemon on my team. I would definitely try this challenge as well too. We’ll have to remember this idea for another time… Maybe even for Pokemon Sword and Pokemon Shield down the line!

What did you think of the challenge? Did you try it? Let us know in the comments below! If you like this post, please share it around.

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